Return to Headlines

Chapter 8 - Auxiliary Services

Chapter 8.0 Table of Contents

    1. 8.09 School Safety Monitoring
    2. 8.10 Safety
    3. 8.11 Safety Program
    4. 8.12 School Police
    5. 8.13 Toxic Substances
    6. 8.15 Infectional Control Guideline
    7. 8.17 Inspections
    8. 8.20 Disaster Preparedness
    9. 8.21 Threat Management Teams
    10. 8.22 Mental Health of Students
    11. 8.23 Sanitation and Preventative Maintenance
    12. 8.25 Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Charging
    13. 8.26 Vandalism and Malicious Mischief
    14. 8.30 Student Transportation
    15. 8.32 Bus Routes 
    16. 8.33 Bus Emergency Evacuation Drills
    17. 8.34 Safety Belts or Other Restraint Systems
    18. 8.35 School Bus Operators
    19. 8.36 Transporting Students in Private Vehicles
    20. 8.37 Seat Belts in Motor Vehicles
    21. 8.38 Automotive Equipment Use and Maintenance
    22. 8.39 Vehicle Maintenance Program
    23. 8.40 Buses or Other Common Carrier for Extracurricular and Field Trips
    24. 8.41 Use and Care of Driver Education Cars
    25. 8.42 General Food Services Requirements
    26. 8.44 Meal Patterns
    27. 8.45 Wellness Policy
    28. 8.46 Use of Food Facilities
    29. 8.48 Free and Reduced Meals
    30. 8.49 Summer Nutrition Program
    31. 8.50 Educational Facilities Planning
    32. 8.51 Academic and Community Excellence (ACE) Planning Process
    33. 8.52 Educational Specifications
    34. 8.53 Consolidation Impact Review Process
    35. 8.54 Construction, Renovation or Remodeling of Facilities
    36. 8.55 Prequalification of Construction Contractors
    37. 8.56 Change Orders
    38. 8.57 Substantial and Final Completion of Construction Projects
    39. 8.58 Improvements to School Plants and Grounds
    40. 8.59 Naming or Renaming Schools
    41. 8.591 Naming or Renaming Facilities
    42. 8.60 Technical Plan
    43. 8.70 Information Technology
    44. 8.71 Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)
    45. 8.72 Data Systems Security
    46. 8.73 Enterprise Data Management 
    47. 8.74 District Control of Data Processing Resources
    48. 8.75 Assignment of Portable Electronic Equipment
    49. 8.80 Records Retention and Disposal
    50. 8.90 Courier and Delivery Services
    51. 8.92 Warehousing and Distribution
    52. 8.95 Conservation of Resources
    53. 8.96 Critical Incident Preparedness
    54. 8.97 Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence
    55. 8.98 School Safety Requirements and Progressive Discipline

8.09 SCHOOL SAFETY MONITORING AND REQUIREMENTS

The School Board is committed to maintaining safe and secure environments in all district schools which requires critical assessment and monitoring of safety and security best practices and procedures.

  1. SCHOOL SAFETY SPECIALIST
    The Superintendent shall designate a School Safety Specialist for the District. The School Safety Specialist must be a school administrator employed by the District or a law enforcement officer employed by the sheriff’s office located in the school district. The School Safety Specialist must earn a certificate of completion of the School Safety Specialist training provided by the Office of Safe Schools within 1 year after appointment. The School Safety Specialist is responsible for the supervision and oversight of all school safety and security personnel, policies, and
    procedures in the District. The School Safety Specialist's responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:
    1. Reviewing District policies and procedures for compliance with Florida law and applicable rules, including the District's timely and accurate submission of school environmental safety incident reports to the Department pursuant to F.S. 1001.212;
    2. Providing necessary training and resources to students and staff in matters relating to youth mental health awareness and assistance; emergency procedures, including active shooter training; and school safety and security;
    3. Serving as the District liaison with local public safety agencies and national, State, and community agencies and organizations in matters of school safety and security;
    4. In collaboration with appropriate public safety agencies, conducting a school security risk assessment at each District school using the Florida Safe School Assessment Tool developed by the Office of Safe Schools annually by October 1; The District will report to FLDOE by October 15th of each year that all public schools within the District have completed the assessment using the Florida Safe Schools Assessment Tool. For purposes of this section, "public safety agencies" means a functional division of a public agency which provides firefighting, law enforcement, medical, or other emergency services.
    5. Coordinating with appropriate public safety agencies, as defined in F.S. 365.171, that are designated as first responders to a school's campus to conduct a tour of such campus once every three (3) years and to provide
      recommendations related to school safety; Any changes related to school safety, emergency issues, and recommendations provided by the public safety agencies will be considered as part of the recommendations by the School Safety Specialist to the Board.
    6. The School Safety Specialist shall ensure that all school personnel, including safe-school officers, within the district receive youth mental health awareness and assistance training to all school personnel as set forth in F.S. 1012.584 and Rule 6A-1.0018, F.A.C. The School Safety Specialist will coordinate with the Superintendent or the Superintendent’s designee(s) to submit to the Department of Education the annual certification that at least 80% of school personnel, including personnel at charter schools, have completed the approved training. The training program shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
      1. an overview of mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders and the need to reduce the stigma of mental illness;
      2. information on the potential risk factors and warning signs of emotional disturbance, mental illness, or substance use disorders, including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, psychosis, eating disorders, and selfinjury, as well as common treatments for those conditions and how to assess those risks; and
      3. information on how to engage at-risk students with skills, resources, and knowledge required to assess the situation, and how to identify and encourage the student to use appropriate professional help and other support strategies, including, but not limited to, peer, social, or self-help care.
      4. Additionally, the District's School Safety Specialist shall earn or designate one (1) or more individuals to earn, certification as a youth mental health awareness and assistance trainer as set forth in F.S. 1012.584.
  2. SCHOOL SAFETY MONITORING BY THE SCHOOL SAFETY SPECIALIST
    1. The School Safety Specialist shall review district and charter school safety policies and procedures at least annually for compliance with state law and rules, as provided by Section 1006.07(6)(a)1., F.S. The School Safety Specialist will coordinate with the Superintendent or the Superintendent’s designee(s) to submit all school district and charter school policies and written procedures pertaining to the health, safety or welfare of students to the Office of Safe Schools by July 1 of each year. 
    2. School Safety Coverage and Noncompliance
      1. The School Safety Specialist shall ensure coverage of one or more safe school officers at each school within the district, including charter schools. A safe-school officer must be present, at minimum, during the school day when the school is open for instruction, as defined by the district school board calendar.
      2. Identification of Noncompliance. Deficiencies relating to School Safety Officer (SSO), School Safety Assistant (SSA) or Deputy Sheriff Officer coverage shall be promptly reported to the School Safety Specialist by the affected school principal or designee.
      3. Correction of Noncompliance. The School Safety Specialist shall resolve the deficiency by the next business day by ensuring coverage of the school by (1) assigning a School Safety Officer or School Safety Assistant from the Duval County School Police or (2) contacting the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office Secondary Employment Unit for coverage by a Deputy Sheriff Officer.
      4. Notification of Noncompliance.
        1. The School Safety Specialist shall provide notice to the Superintendent of suspected deficiencies related to noncompliance, as follows:
          1. Notice of any deficiencies relating to safe-school officer coverage and any instance of noncompliance that is determined to be an imminent threat to the health, safety, or welfare of students or staff shall be provided within twenty-four (24) hours.
          2. Notice of any noncompliance not corrected within thirty (30) days shall be provided within the following three (3) days.
        2. The School Safety Specialist will notify the Office of Safe Schools within twenty-four (24) hours at SafeSchools@fldoe.org of any deficiencies relating to safe-school officer coverage and any instance of noncompliance that is determined to be an imminent threat to the health, safety, or welfare of students or staff. Notice must contain particularized facts beyond noncompliance with rule or statute that explain the imminent threat.
        3. The School Safety Specialist will provide notification to the Office of Safe Schools within three (3) days at SafeSchools@fldoe.org of any instance of noncompliance not corrected within sixty (60) days.
  3. RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE SCHOOL SAFETY SPECIALIST
    1. Based on the findings of the annual school security risk assessment, the School Safety Specialist must provide recommendations to the Superintendent and School Board annually in September, which identify
      strategies and activities that the Board should implement in order to address the findings and improve school safety and security.
    2. The Board will review the school security risk assessment findings and the recommendations of the School Safety Specialist at a publicly noticed Board meeting to provide the public an opportunity to hear the district school board members discuss and take action on the findings and recommendations.
    3. The School Safety Specialist shall report the school security risk assessment finding and the School Board action(s) to the Office of Safe Schools no later than thirty (30) days after the Board meeting.
  4. ADDITIONAL SCHOOL SAFETY PROVISIONS
    1. The District School Safety Specialist shall ensure the assignment of School Safety Officers outside of the regular school day. This assignment shall include events during, before, and after school to include summer school, summer camps, school-sponsored events and during extracurricular activities. The Superintendent or designee shall develop administrative procedures to ensure the coverage of traditional district schools while considering factors such as the number of persons present, the ratio of staff members to students, and other safety measures available.
    2. Threat Management Teams
      1. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure the establishment of Threat Management Teams at each school as provided by Section 1006.07, F.S. and set forth in Board Policy 8.21.
      2. The district shall ensure that all threat management teams in the district report to the Office of Safe Schools on the team’s activities during the previous school year. The district School Safety Specialist must ensure all schools in the district timely report information related to threat management teams as required by the Office of Safe Schools.
    3. The District shall implement the zero-tolerance provisions as provided by Section 1006.13, F.S., and set forth in Board Policy 5.28.
    4. The School Safety Specialist will coordinate with the School Choice Office and state agencies, if necessary, to allow charter school personnel input access to the Florida Safe Schools Assessment Tool (FSSAT) to ensure school safety and security reporting requirements include data from district charter schools.
    5. The District’s Active Assailant Response Plan as provided by Section 1006.07, F.S. shall be included in the Board approved emergency procedural manual and appropriate preparedness plans as described in Board Policy 3.40. The Active Assailant Response Plan will include, at a minimum, plans and expectations for responding to an active assailant situation using the following three (3) strategies: evading or evacuating, taking cover or hiding, and responding to or fighting back.
    6. The School Safety Specialist shall develop procedures for emergency drills and fire drills in accordance with Rule 6A-1.0018, F.A.C., and Board Policy 8.96, Critical Incident Preparedness. The procedures shall be located within the District’s Emergency Procedures Manual (DEPM). 
    7. The Superintendent is responsible for ensuring the accurate and timely reporting of incidents related to school safety and discipline. The Superintendent is responsible for school environmental safety incident reporting as set forth in Board Policy 5.29. A district school superintendent who fails to comply with this subsection is subject to the penalties specified in law, including, but not limited to, sections 1001.42(13)(b) or 1001.51(12)(b), F.S. as applicable.
  5. PARENTAL NOTIFICATION OF THREATS, UNLAWFUL ACTS, OR SIGNIFICANT EMERGENCIES

    In the event of potential threats to student and staff safety, communication with parents, guardians, and the school community is vital. Accurate and timely information from the school or school district provides parents and guardians the resources they need to support the school, school district, and law enforcement in managing the situation and maximizing student and staff safety during and after a threat or incident.

      1. The District will provide notification to parents when there are substantive threats, unlawful acts, or significant emergencies as defined in section 1006.07(4)(b), F.S., that occur on school grounds, during school transportation, or during school-sponsored activities. Such substantive threats, unlawful acts, or significant emergencies include, the following:
        1. Substantive threats pursuant to section 1006.07(7), F.S. (Threat Managment Teams)
        2. Weapons possession or use when there is intended harm toward another person, hostage, and active assailant situations.
        3. Murder, homicide, or manslaughter.
        4. Sex offenses, including rape, sexual assault, or sexual misconduct with a student by school personnel.
        5. Natural emergencies, including hurricanes, tornadoes, and severe storms.
        6. Exposure as a result of a manmade emergency.
      2. Student Privacy Rights. Parental notifications must be made in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 U.S.C. s. 1232g, 34 C.F.R. Part 99, and Section 1002.22, F.S.
      3. Administrative Procedures. The Superintendent or their designee shall develop administrative procedures for the implementation of this policy. The procedures shall address the content, scope, manner, and timing of the notifications based on the impact to the entire school, students or staff generally, unspecified groups, or defined students.
      4. This policy or the administrative procedures hereto shall not preclude the district from making additional notifications regarding threats or incidents which are necessary to inform parents and safeguard the community.
      5. Consultation with Law Enforcement and First Responders. Consultations with law enforcement will be made in accordance with the guidelines for School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting and the district’s Student Code of Conduct. Parental notification of an imminent threat of harm to students, including an active assailant incident or hostage situation, must be made in consultation with local law enforcement and first responders in order to avoid compromising the safety of students and the efficacy of the emergency response and investigation.
      6. Involvement of the Threat Management Team. The Threat Management Team will be initiated in accordance with section 1006.13, F.S., in alignment with the Office of Safe Schools model policies, Board Policy 8.21, Threat Management Teams, and the Student Code of Conduct.
  6. DISTRICT TRAINING. School-based staff shall receive school safety training at least twice per school year. Training shall include, at minimum, relevant school safety requirements, best practices, and updates related to school operations. The training content must be approved by the School Safety Specialist.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.07, 1006.12, 1006.13, 1006.1493 ,1001.212,1012.584, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.0018
HISTORY:  ADOPTED: OCTOBER 5, 2021

REVISED: OCTOBER 10, 2022; FEBRUARY 7, 2023; AUGUST 1, 2023; MAY 7, 2024

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.10 SAFETY

  1. The school and building principal shall cooperate with the School Police Department, the Jacksonville Fire Rescue Division (JFRD), the Risk Management Department, and the Operations Department in providing safe conditions for students, employees, and visitors.
  2. All School Board employees and contracted employees shall take all reasonable precautions to protect the physical welfare of each student.
  3. The use of electronic devices for texting or other written communications is prohibited while driving in District vehicles, except when necessary, for School Police emergency functions.
  4. The school and building principal shall remove hazards where possible and shall report via the established District work-order system all other known hazards.
  5. The school and building principal, in cooperation with the faculty, the noninstructional staff, the Risk Management Department, and the District Occupational Safety Committee shall establish a school safety plan in an effort to
    prevent accidents to students, employees, and visitors. The Safety Program shall include regular meetings, but not less than 2 times per semester, of the School Site Safety Committee; minutes of these meetings shall be kept on file at the school.
  6. The Supervisor of Risk Management shall serve in an advisory capacity to all heads of major units within the District and shall promote and, in consult with the District Occupational Safety Committee, develop an accident prevention and safety education program for occupational, facility, and fire safety.
  7. The District shall annually conduct a self-assessment of safety and security practices under the direction of the Superintendent or his/her designee. Based upon this self-assessment and other concerns, if applicable, the Superintendent shall present appropriate recommendations to the School Board for increasing safety and security and the School Board shall take such actions as it deems necessary and appropriate to address safety and security in the District or at individual sites.
  8. A District Occupational Safety Committee shall be formed with responsibility for recommending policy revisions, creating procedures, including a safety manual, to implement policy, and setting the strategic direction for district-wide employee, facility, and fire safety. The purpose of this committee is long term risk prevention to reduce bodily injuries and claim costs for workers compensation and premises liabilities. It will also address regulatory compliance related to occupational and fire safety. This committee will include representatives from the maintenance, consolidated services, risk management, and HR departments, and a school-based representative designated by the Chief of Schools. This committee shall meet not less than quarterly.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 316.614, 1001.43, 1001.54, 1006.07, 1012.28, 1013.12, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-2.0010
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015; JULY 2, 2019;JULY 12, 2021

FORMERLY: EB, JLIC

Back to Top


8.11 SAFETY PROGRAM

The Board recognizes the necessity of a comprehensive Risk Management Safety Program designed to provide for the safety and health of its employees, students and the protection of its physical facilities and environment. This program shall ensure compliance with all applicable local, state and federal rules, regulations and procedures as they pertain to the safety and health of employees and students and to the security of District facilities. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as adopted by the state of Florida, for enforcement in all public sector employment locations, shall be strictly adhered to, in addition to the provisions relating to safety and health as contained in Florida Statutes.

This comprehensive program shall provide for the following:

  1. Safety requirement for employees, students and visitors
  2. Loss prevention/safety training
  3. Work site safety inspections
  4. Reporting of hazards
  5. Work site safety committees
  6. Accident/incident reports
  7. Security
  8. Planning
  9. Security of personnel
  10. Security of facilities
  11. Monitoring


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 316.614, 1006.062, 1006.07, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 1, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015

FORMERLY: EB

Back to Top


8.12 SCHOOL POLICE

  1. BACKGROUND
    Pursuant to Section 1006.12, Florida Statutes, the Duval County School Board has established a School Safety Officer (SSO) program. School Safety Officers shall be certified sworn law enforcement officers and must meet qualifications for employment as provided in Florida Statute Chapter 943, and other employment requirements as established by the School Board. School Safety officers shall comply with all School Board policies unless an exemption is provided herein. Additionally, the School Police Department will establish a School Guardian program (School Safety Assistant), as authorized by Section 1006.12, F.S. The School Board may also implement any combination of the options in subsections (1)-(4) of Section 1006.12. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary above, the School Board and/or School Police may not utilize the option set forth under 1006.12 (3)(a), which provides that a school district employee or personnel, as defined under s. 1012.01, may volunteer to serve as a school guardian in addition to his or her official job duties.
  2. POWERS AND DUTIES
    The powers and duties of the law enforcement officer shall continue throughout the employee’s tenure as a School Safety Officer. School Safety Officers have and shall exercise the power to make arrests for violations of law on district school board property or on property owned or leased by a charter school under a charter contract, as applicable, or at any district school sanctioned event, and to arrest persons, whether on or off such property, who violate any laws on such property under the same conditions that deputy sheriffs are authorized to make arrests as established through a Memorandum of Understanding with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall develop a written directive system to promote equal and fair law enforcement standards, to maximize the capability of the School Police Department, to deter and control criminal activities, and to increase interagency cooperation throughout the state. The written directive system shall include procedures that, at a minimum, address: (1) vehicle pursuits, (2) property and evidence collection, (3) allegations of misconduct, (4) response to resistance, (5) traffic stops, (6) weapons of mass destruction, (7) active assailant/rapid response, (8) prisoner transport, and (9) field training programs, (10) bias in policing, (11) de-escalation of force, and (12) Baker Acts. For the purposes of this policy, the Superintendent’s designee shall be the Duval County Public Schools Chief of Police.
  3. WRITTEN DIRECTIVE SYSTEM 
    The written directive system shall address the normal day to day operations of the School Police Department. Not less than two weeks prior to implementation, all procedural orders shall be provided to the Board for review and input. The procedural orders included in the written directive system shall be approved by the Superintendent or his/her designee and issued to all police officers by the Chief of Police upon approval. All procedural orders shall have the following format: (a) Name of the Order, (b) Scope (to whom the Order applies), (c) Order Number (d)
    Purpose Statement (e) Subject Matter of the Order and (f) Effective Date of the Order. The Duval County School Board acknowledges that unforeseeable emergency situations will be addressed by the district’s Chief of Police utilizing law enforcement best practices.
  4. MUTUAL AID AGREEMENTS
    The Superintendent or his/her designee may enter into mutual aid agreements on behalf of the School Board, with other law enforcement agencies as provided in Chapter 23, Florida Statutes.
  5. POLICY REVIEW
    This policy shall be reviewed annually in June.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 23.1225, 30.15, 112.19(2)(A), 316.640, 943.13,1006.12, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: DECEMBER 7, 2010
REVISION DATE(S): SEPTEMBER 2, 2014; JULY 2, 2019; JULY 12, 2021; DECEMBER 7, 2021; JULY 11, 2022

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.13 TOXIC SUBSTANCES

The Superintendent shall develop and implement a program to ensure School Board employees are provided information concerning the nature of toxic substances which are used in the workplace. The program shall include, but not be limited to:

  1. Notification of School Board employees of where to direct requests for information on such substances;
  2. An orientation session, within thirty (30) days of employment, for all new School Board employees to advise them of any adverse health effects which may occur as a result of contact with toxic substances; and,
  3. Distribution of information regarding the use of any toxic substances in the District
    school system to the local fire department.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1013.49, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
FORMERLY: EB

Back to Top


8.15 INFECTION CONTROL GUIDELINES

  1. School Board employees who handle students’ body secretions shall adhere to procedures which emphasize avoidance of direct contact of employees’ skin and mucous membranes with blood and other body secretions or wastes of persons who may have a communicable disease.
  2. The District Occupational Safety Committee in collaboration with the Operations and Human Resource Services departments, and in consult with the Director of School Health, the Department of Health, and other outside entities as may be appropriate shall develop guidelines for infection control which shall include, but not be limited to:
    1. General precautions for at-risk School Board employees who handle body fluids and potentially contaminated materials.
    2. Cleaning procedures for school custodians.
    3. Instructions for cleaning any potentially contaminated blood spills.
  3. The Director of School Health shall develop special precautions for health care workers and school nurses who handle body fluids and containers.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 381.006, 1001.43, 1012.23, 1013.12, F.S.
STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH RULE(S): CHAPTER 64E-16
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015; JULY 12, 2021

FORMERLY: ECD

Back to Top


8.17 INSPECTIONS

  1. Provisions shall be made for regular and frequent inspections of all school facilities. Inspections shall include use of safety and sanitation devices for storage, handling, and disposal of flammable materials and chemicals and maintenance of the science laboratories in accordance with Florida Administrative Code 6A-2.0010.
  2. All school buildings shall be inspected at least once during each school fiscal year by a person who is qualified to conduct inspections in accordance with the State Requirements for Educational Facilities. Such inspection shall be conducted for fire safety, casualty safety, and sanitation in accordance with Chapter 5 and other applicable sections of the State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A copy of such inspection report(s) shall be submitted to the principal, Superintendent, and School Board.
  3. The Superintendent shall report to the designated state agency the results of initial and subsequent measurements on the level of indoor radon in all District school buildings and any facility housing students.
  4. Bleachers shall be inspected every two (2) years by a structural engineer who is certified by the State of Florida.
  5. When an authorized agent under the Florida Fire Prevention Code conducts a fire safety inspection as authorized in Florida Statutes, and it is determined that a serious fire safety hazard exists which poses an immediate danger to the public health, safety, or welfare, the authorized agent and Superintendent are permitted to issue a joint order to vacate the facility in question, which order shall be effective immediately. The Superintendent shall immediately notify the School Board members about such an order.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY:  1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.

LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 126.56, 404.056, Chapter 633, 1001.43, 1013.12, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-2.0010, F.A.C.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 2, 2019; NOVEMBER 10, 2008 

FORMERLY: EBA

Back to Top


8.20 DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

  1. Schools may be designated as emergency shelters or centers for emergency management use in the event of a disaster, including hurricanes, natural disasters, civil disobedience and acts of terror. When activated, principals or their designees shall be available to prepare their school as an emergency shelter and to look after the interests of the school’s systems during shelter operations.
  2. Each school principal shall review the District Emergency Management Plan and provide a disaster plan for his/her facility. All information relating to emergency procedures shall be made available to employees and other appropriate agencies. Notice of activation shall come from the Superintendent or his/her designee.
  3. All employees activated in an emergency situation are required to report to their duty stations.
    1. All employees activated during an emergency will be paid according to established School Board policy or Collective Bargaining Agreement.
    2. Classifications with no overtime policy will be paid at their normal hourly rate.
    3. Activated principals and assistant principals shall be paid at their normal hourly rate for the first eight (8) hours served on a regular workday or weekend. After which, all additional hours shall be paid at a rate of one and one-half times the administrator’s normal hourly rate, with the exception of holidays. All hours served on a holiday shall be paid at a rate of two times the administrator’s normal hourly rate. 
    4. Refer to the City of Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division Sheltering Plan referenced in the appendix of the current City of Jacksonville Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan.
  4. An accurate record must be kept of all supplies used from the school and district inventories.
  5. The district Finance, Purchasing, Maintenance, Technology Services, Consolidated Services, and Risk Management departments shall ensure processes are in place to comply with the current Public Assistance Program and Policy Guide and other FEMA documents.
  6. The address and telephone number of a person provided public emergency shelter at a district shelter or emergency center shall be exempt from public disclosure pursuant to Section 119, Florida Statutes.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.43, 1013.10, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015; JULY 2, 2019; JULY 12, 2021; OCTOBER 5, 2021; NOVEMBER 7, 2023.

FORMERLY: EBA

Back to Top


8.21 THREAT MANAGEMENT TEAMS

  1. The Superintendent, or his or her designee, shall develop administrative procedures for the prevention of violence on school grounds, including coordination of resources, training, and the assessment and intervention with individuals whose behavior poses a threat to the safety of the school community. This policy is adopted for the establishment of Threat Management Teams at each school, whose duties include the coordination of resources and assessment and intervention with students whose behavior may pose a threat to the safety of school, school staff, or students. The duties of the Threat Management Teams shall be consistent with the model policies developed by the Florida Department of Education, Office of Safe Schools, which shall include procedures for referrals to mental health services identified by the District.
  2. Upon the availability of a statewide behavioral threat management operational process developed pursuant to s. 1001.212(12), all Threat Management Teams shall use the operational process.
  3. Composition of Threat Management Teams
    1. Each Threat Management Team shall include persons with expertise in:
      1. Counseling
      2. Instruction
      3. School Administration
      4. Law Enforcement
    2. A school counselor shall be designated for the Threat Management Team.
    3. It is the expectation that each school principal shall serve as the school administrator. In their unavoidable absence, principals may designate an assistant principal to serve, and shall inform their Region Superintendent of the designation within a reasonable time of each occurrence.
    4. The school principal shall designate an instructional staff member to serve as a member of the school's Threat Management Team.
    5. The Duval County School Police Department shall designate its law enforcement representative to serve as the law enforcement member of the Threat Management Team.
    6. For continuity, the same school-based personnel will serve each time the Threat Management Team is convened.
    7. At least one member of the Threat Management Team must have personal familiarity with the individual who is the subject of the threat assessment. If no member of the Threat Management Team has such familiarity, an instructional personnel or administrative personnel, as those terms are defined in s. 1012.01(2) and (3), who is personally familiar with the individual who is the subject of the threat assessment must consult with the Threat Management Team for the purpose of assessing the threat. The instructional or administrative personnel who provides such consultation shall not participate in the final decision-making process. 
    8. All members of the Threat Management Team must be involved in the threat assessment and threat management process and final decision-making. 
  4. The Superintendent, or his or her designee, shall create procedures for the purposes of:
    1. Identifying any additional team participants by position and role;
    2. Designating the individuals (by position) who are responsible for gathering and investigating information; and
    3. Identifying the steps and procedures to be followed from initiation to conclusion of the threat assessment inquiry or investigation.
  5. Threat Management Teams at each school must be fully staffed, as required by Rule 6A-1.0018(10)(e), F.A.C., and all team members must complete Comprehensive School Threat Assessment Guidelines (CSTAG) training before the start of the school year. Those appointed to Threat Management Teams after the start of the school year must complete CSTAG training within ninety (90) days of appointment.
  6. The Threat Management Teams shall identify members of the school community to whom threatening behavior should be reported and provide guidance to students, faculty, and staff regarding recognition of threatening or aberrant behavior that may represent a threat to the community, school, or self.
  7. Florida-Specific Behavioral Threat Assessment Instrument
    1. Upon the availability of the Florida-specific behavioral threat assessment instrument developed pursuant to s. 1001.212(12), all Threat Management Teams shall use that instrument when evaluating the behavior of students who may pose a threat to the school, school staff, or students and to coordinate intervention and services for such students. 
    2. The Threat Management Team shall prepare a threat assessment report required by the Florida-specific behavioral threat assessment instrument. A threat assessment report, all corresponding documentation, and any other information required by the instrument in the threat management portal is an education record.
  8. Upon a preliminary determination by the Threat Management Team that a student poses a threat of violence, or physical harm to himself or herself or others or exhibits significantly disruptive behavior or need for assistance:
    1. The Threat Management Team shall immediately report its determination to the superintendent or his or her designee.
    2. Authorized members of the Threat Management Team may obtain criminal history record information. A member of a Threat Management Team may not disclose any criminal history record information obtained pursuant to this section or otherwise use any record of an individual beyond the purpose for which such disclosure was made to the Threat Management Team.
    3. The school principal or designee shall immediately attempt to notify the parent or legal guardian of a student when the student is assessed by the Threat Management Team. Nothing in this subsection shall preclude school district personnel from acting immediately to address an imminent threat.
  9. REFERRAL TO MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
    1. Students referred for a mental health screening must be assessed within 15 calendar days of referral.
    2. School-based mental health services must be initiated within 15 calendar days of identification and assessment.
    3. Community-based health services must be initiated within 30 calendar days of referral, coordinating mental health services with a student’s primary mental health care providers and other mental health providers involved in student care.
  10. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, all state and local agencies and programs that provide services to students experiencing or at risk of an emotional disturbance or a mental illness, including the District, charter schools, school personnel, state and local law enforcement agencies, the Department of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Children and Families, the Department of Health, the Agency for Health Care Administration, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the Department of Education, the Statewide Guardian Ad Litem Office, and any service or support provider contracting with such agencies, may share with each other records or information that are confidential or exempt from disclosure under Chapter 119, F.S., if the records or information are reasonably necessary to ensure access to appropriate services for the student or to ensure the safety of the student or others. All such state and local agencies and programs shall communicate, collaborate, and coordinate efforts to serve such students.
  11. Each school’s Threat ManagementTeam shall meet at least monthly, or as often as necessary to ensure that students are appropriately assessed and referred to services to mitigate potential harm to the student or others. Threat Managment Teams are not precluded from acting immediately to address an imminent threat.
  12. DOCUMENTATION AND MAINTENANCE OF STUDENT RECORDS
    1. Threat Management Teams shall maintain documentation of their meetings, including meeting dates and times, team members in attendance, cases discussed, and actions taken. All reported threats, even those determined not to be a threat, must be documented by the threat assessment team. Documentation must include the evaluation process and any resultant action.
    2. The principal will ensure that the appropriate school administrator collect and record all required documentation on the Comprehensive School Threat Assessment Guidelines (CSTAG) form approved by the Office of Safe Schools for statistical retention and reporting as required, and all team members are trained in the completion of the form as required by 1001.212, F.S.
    3. Substantive and Transient Threats, as defined by the Office of Safe Schools, shall be maintained in a student’s file as long as determined useful by a Threat Management Team. Student records must contain verified reports of serious or recurrent behavior patterns, including substantive and transient threat assessments and intervention services, and psychological evaluations, including therapeutic treatment plans and therapy progress notes created or maintained by the district.
    4. Non-Threats. In order to protect students from stigma and unintended consequences, reported threats which are determined by a Threat Management Team not to be a threat at all, meaning the threat does not rise to the level of transient or substantive, may be maintained by the Threat Management Team, but must not be maintained in a student’s educational record unless one of the following conditions are met:
      1. The parent of the student who was the subject of a non-threat finding requests that the record be retained in the student’s file; or
      2. The Threat Management Team has made a determination that the non-threat finding must be retained in order to ensure the continued safety of the school community or to ensure the well-being of the student. Such determination and reasoning for maintaining the record must be documented with the non-threat finding. Where such a determination is made, the Threat Management Team must re-evaluate the decision on an annual basis to determine if the record is no longer useful. The student’s age and length of time since the original assessment must be considered in those evaluations.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 119.07, 985.047, 1006.07, 1006.13, 1001.212, 1006.1493, 1012.584, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.0018, 6A-1.0955
HISTORY: ADOPTED: JANUARY 7, 2019
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 12, 2021; OCTOBER 5, 2021; JULY 11, 2022; FEBRUARY 7, 2023, JULY 10, 2023.

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.22 MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS

It is the value of the Duval County School Board to provide care and concern for the safety and well-being of students experiencing mental health concerns within the school community. The District has the primary responsibility of ensuring interventions when personnel identifies or is made aware of a student experiencing a mental health concern. The District is further committed to providing referrals and resources to promote continuity of care. The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act provides access to mental health assessment and intervention services for students exhibiting signs and symptoms.

  1. MENTAL HEALTH COORDINATOR.The Superintendent shall designate a Mental Health Coordinator for the District who shall serve as the district’s primary point of contact regarding the district’s coordination, communication, and implementation of student mental health policies, procedures, responsibilities, and reporting, including:
    1. Coordinating with the Office of Safe Schools, established pursuant to section 1001.212, F.S.;
    2. Maintaining records and reports regarding student mental health as it relates to school safety and the mental health assistance allocation pursuant to section 1011.62(14), F.S.;
    3. Facilitating the implementation of school district policies relating to the respective duties and responsibilities of the school district, the Superintendent, and school principals;
    4. Coordinating with the School Safety Specialist on the staffing and training of threat management teams and facilitating referrals to mental health services, as appropriate, for students and their families;
    5. Coordinating with the School Safety Specialist on the training and resources for students and school district staff relating to youth mental health awareness and assistance;
    6. Reviewing annually the school district’s policies and procedures related to student mental health for compliance with state law and alignment with current best practices and make recommendations, as needed, for amending such policies and procedures to the Superintendent and the School Board.
  2. Screenings for the Identification of Mental Health Concerns
    1. The District shall provide school-based faculty and staff access to youth mental health training to aid them in identifying signs and symptoms that are indicative of a mental health concern. If there is a concern, a referral to Full Service Schools is made to determine the appropriate level of care.
    2. Mental Health Referrals
      1. Students referred to a school-based or community-based mental health service provider for mental health screening for the identification of mental health concerns and students at risk for mental health disorders must be assessed within fifteen (15) days of referral.
      2. School-based mental health services must be initiated within fifteen (15) days after identification and assessment.
      3. Support by community-based mental health service providers for students who are referred for community-based mental health services must be initiated within 30 days after the school or district makes a referral.
    3. Resources for Parents and Families of Students Receiving Services
      1. Parents of a student receiving services under this section will be provided information about other behavioral health services available through the student’s school or local community-based behavioral health services providers. Information and web-based sources can also be found on the district’s School Behavioral Health webpage.
      2. Individuals living in a household with a student receiving services under this section will be provided information about behavioral health services available through other delivery systems or payors for which such individuals may qualify, if such services appear to be needed or enhancements in those individuals’ behavioral health would contribute to the improved well-being of the student.
  3. Initiating Involuntary Mental Health Assessments for Students in Crisis. Section 394.463, Florida Statutes provides students in crisis with immediate access to mental health assessment and intervention services. A student qualifies for involuntary intervention, assessment, and examination if the student exhibits the intent to commit suicide, to inflict bodily harm to self, or to commit bodily harm to others.
    1. Self-Harm. If a student is actively engaged in behaviors of harming self (i.e., behaviors that require immediate medical attention) or expresses or exhibits behavior that suggests potential danger to self, the principal or the principal’s designee shall contact the District Crisis Hotline for further evaluation, or law enforcement where warranted.
      1. If law enforcement is contacted to respond to suspected crisis, law enforcement personnel must make a reasonable attempt to contact a mental health professional who may initiate an involuntary examination, unless the student poses an imminent danger to themselves or others, before initiating an involuntary examination pursuant to section 394.463, F.S. Such contact may be in person or using telehealth as defined in section 456.47, F.S. The mental health professional may be available to the District either by contracts or interagency agreements with the managing entity with the local mobile response team.
      2. Before a principal or his or her designee contacts a law enforcement officer, he or she must verify that de-escalation strategies have been utilized and outreach to a mobile response team has been initiated unless the principal or the principal’s designee reasonably believes that any delay in removing the student will increase the likelihood of harm to the student or others 
      3. District schools and local mobile response teams shall use the same suicide screening instrument approved by the Department of Education pursuant to section 1012.583, F.S.
      4. Students in grades 6 through 12 shall be issued student identification cards that include telephone numbers for national or statewide crisis and suicide hotlines and text lines.
    2. Harm to Others. If a student is actively engaged in behavior of harming others (i.e., behaviors that require immediate medical attention) or expresses or exhibits behavior that suggests potential danger to others, the principal or the principal’s designee shall contact law enforcement personnel for further evaluation. If there is a suspected mental health crisis, law enforcement personnel must make a reasonable attempt to contact a mental health professional as set forth in section III, paragraph A(1) of this policy.  
    3. Notification and Reporting Protocol. Following the initial evaluations of the District Crisis Hotline or law enforcement personnel, as appropriate, the Rapid Response Team may be engaged for further evaluation and determination of whether involuntary mental health assessment is appropriate. If the Rapid Response Team determines that involuntary examination is appropriate, the following will occur:
      1. The principal/designee shall provide for immediate and reasonable attempts to notify a student’s parent, guardian, or emergency contact following the Rapid Response Team’s decision to initiate an involuntary examination of a student.
        1. Reasonableness shall be defined as “the exercise of reasonable diligence and care by the principal or the principal’s designee to make contact with the student’s parent, guardian or other known emergency contact whom the student’s parent or guardian has authorized to receive notification of an involuntary examination.”
        2. Reasonable attempts shall include, at a minimum, methods such as telephone calls, text messages, emails, and voicemails, as available.
        3. If the emergency contact is reached instead of the parent, the principal can only share that the parent needs to immediately contact the school.
      2. Notification and attempts shall be made prior to the student’s removal from school, school transportation, or school-sponsored activity for an involuntary examination under section 394.463, Florida Statutes. The principal or designee may delay the required notification for no more than twenty-four (24) hours after the student is removed if:
        1. The principal or designee deems the delay to be in the student’s best interest and a report has been submitted to the central abuse hotline, pursuant to section 39.201, Florida Statutes based upon knowledge or suspicion of abuse, abandonment, or neglect; or
        2. The principal or principal’s designee reasonably believes that such delay is necessary to avoid jeopardizing the health and safety of the student.
      3. The principal or designee must follow appropriate administrative procedures to document the involuntary examination in the Department of Education’s Involuntary Examination Reporting System, to include the method, number of attempts and the outcome of each attempt made to contact the student’s parent guardian or other known emergency contact.
    4. Onsite school personnel shall report all such situations and actions taken pursuant to this policy to the Threat Management Team, which shall contact the other agencies involved with the student and any known service providers to share information and coordinate any necessary follow-up actions. Upon the student’s transfer to a different school, the threat management team shall verify that any intervention services provided to the student remain in place until the threat management team of the receiving school independently determines the need for intervention services.
    5. Following a crisis assessment, a referral shall be made to Full Service School by the school designee to ensure continuity of care. If a student is assessed for an involuntary examination, the mental health referral policy is as follows:
      1. Threat Management Team member submits referral to the Full Service School Social Worker;
      2. The Full Service School Social Worker conducts an initial assessment within fifteen (15) days of referral;
      3. The Full Service School Therapist conducts Initiation of Services within fifteen (15) days of the assessment.
      4. Within thirty (30) days of the initial assessment, ongoing mental health services will be provided by the school-based mental health therapist.
      5. Students that require the services of a community-based mental health service provider (outpatient) will be referred within thirty (30) days.
      6. The above is contingent upon consent of the parent or legal guardian.
    6. The Superintendent shall report annually to the Department of Education the number of involuntary examinations that were initiated at a school, at a school-sponsored activity, or on school transportation.
  4. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall develop administrative procedures to implement this policy.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S. LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 381.0056, 394.463, 1002.20, 1002.33,1011.62, 1006.07, 1006.12, F.S. HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 2, 2021 REVISION(S): JULY 11, 2022; JULY 10, 2023

Back to Top


8.23 SANITATION AND PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE 

  1. The Board shall strive to provide well-maintained schools and facilities which are safe from hazards, are sanitary, and are properly equipped and adequately lighted and ventilated. The Superintendent shall be responsible for maintenance and upkeep of school plants.
  2. The school principal or work site supervisor or designee shall be responsible for maintaining satisfactory standards of sanitation and housekeeping. A formal inspection of all buildings under his/her supervision shall be made at least once each month including all toilet areas, food service areas, storage rooms, and other student or staff occupied areas. The administrator shall complete the District Custodial Inspection Form and shall maintain it on file in his/her office.
  3. The Manager of Custodial Services, with the assistance of school principals, shall be responsible for the placement, supervision, and training of custodial personnel.
  4. The principal shall report, in writing, to the facilities department any needed repairs to any buildings or the grounds. Any emergency repairs shall be reported to the department by telephone and confirmed in writing.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.43, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
FORMERLY: ECB

Back to Top


8.25 PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE (PEV) CHARGING

In a time of fluctuating petroleum prices and heightened carbon emission concerns, employee owned Plug-In Electric Vehicles (“PEV”) represent a clear way for employees to reduce driving costs and reduce environmental impacts. The number of PEVs in the U.S. is steadily increasing which increases the need for PEV charging infrastructure. A potential PEV charging network of exterior 120 Volt electrical outlets is already in place at schools and administrative buildings. This network can be made available to PEV drivers through a “Charge-at-Work” program. Charge-at-Work is possible because many employee vehicles spend the majority of their time parked while at work.

As a result of the aforementioned, the District elects through this policy to authorize the use of existing 120 Volt electrical outlets on District property for employee vehicle recharging and to provide a method for employees to reimburse the District for electricity used. The Charge-at-Work program shall be cost-neutral for electricity costs and only have minimal work order related costs for any needed improvements to existing electrical infrastructure. This policy directs the Superintendent or his/her designee to establish administrative procedures necessary to implement and manage a Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Charge-at-Work program. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall ensure that any administrative procedures developed in direct support of this policy are posted and available for review on the District’s website.

Offering employees the opportunity to participate in a Charge-at-Work program establishes the District as a leader in the reduction of carbon emissions for work to home transportation amongst school districts in Florida. By being proactive in this important and growing area, this policy should also help the District set a positive example to help recruit, employ, and retain employees seeking to improve our environment and reduce operating costs wherever possible.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: OCTOBER 6, 2015 
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.26 VANDALISM AND MALICIOUS MISCHIEF

  1. The principal or designee shall report any vandalism immediately to the Superintendent's designee and to the proper law enforcement agency giving all available information.
  2. A student who willfully damages school property shall be properly disciplined and his/her parent(s) or legal guardian, if the student is a minor, shall be requested, in writing, to restore or to replace any damaged property in accordance with the true value as determined by the principal, the responsible District department head, or in extreme cases the Superintendent and/or School Board. In extreme cases of vandalism, a student shall be subject to suspension or expulsion from school under the charge of serious misconduct. The Code of Student Conduct shall identify disciplinary procedures for students who abuse school property. An adult student involved in the destruction of school property shall be held solely responsible for the damages.
  3. A civil action against the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian may be instituted by the School Board in an appropriate action to recover damages in an amount not to exceed the limit prescribed by Florida Statutes if vandalism or theft of school property is known to have been committed by a minor and the parent(s) or legal guardian refuses to restore or replace the property.
  4. In any case of willful or negligent damage to school property by a person other than a student, the user or the person responsible for the damage shall replace the property or pay the damages in accordance with the true value as determined by the Superintendent.
  5. Each organization which is granted a permit for the use of public property shall be responsible for any damage to the buildings, equipment, or grounds beyond that which would be considered normal wear and tear and shall pay for any such damage in accordance with the true value as determined by the Superintendent. Failure to comply with a request for payment of such assessed damages shall result in the individual, group, or organization being ineligible for further use of school property and such legal action as the School Board deems proper to recover the amount of damages.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S. LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 741.24, 806.13, 1001.43, 1013.10, F.S. HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997 REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; JULY 10, 2023  FORMERLY: ECAC

Back to Top


8.30 STUDENT TRANSPORTATION

  1. The transportation program shall be administered to provide safe and efficient services at the lowest possible cost. Transportation funds shall be used primarily to provide transportation of students to and from the nearest appropriate school as determined by the School Board and in accordance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules.
  2. The Superintendent or designee shall be responsible for supervising, administering, investigating, and resolving problems of the District’s transportation system. This shall include determination that all who have responsibility for student transportation are knowledgeable of applicable Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules.
  3. Maximum regard for the safety of students and due consideration for the protection of health of all students transported shall be primary requirements in the routing of buses, establishing student stops, appointing drivers, and in providing and operating transportation equipment in accordance with requirements of Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules.
  4. Transportation is provided for each student in prekindergarten disability programs and in kindergarten through grade 12 membership in a public school when, and only when, transportation is necessary to provide adequate educational facilities and opportunities which otherwise would not be available and to transport students whose homes are more than a reasonable walking distance from the nearest appropriate school. Students who are approved to attend a District school which is not located in their assigned attendance area shall be ineligible for bus transportation except as permitted by District guidelines.
  5. Any secondary student who resides more than two (2) miles from his/her assigned school is eligible to ride the school bus to and from that school. Any elementary student who resides more than one and a half (1 1/2) miles from his/her assigned school is eligible to ride the school bus to and from that school. One and a half (1 1/2) miles shall be considered a reasonable walking distance to a bus stop for students who are eligible to ride a school bus. Such distance shall be measured by the most direct route from the closest pedestrian entry point of the property where the student resides (where private property meets the public right-of-way) to the closest pedestrian entry point of the assigned school building or to the assigned bus stop. The District shall determine the shortest pedestrian route whether or not it is accessible to motor vehicle traffic. If the closest bus stop is a school less than two (2) miles from the student residence, the one and a half (1 1/2) mile rule to a bus stop will not apply. Students who are assigned to magnet schools and/or programs through the Magnet/School Choice office may be eligible for transportation under this section. The District may also determine that students of other programs, such as Alternative Schools, are eligible for transportation but to which the aforementioned rules for one and a half (11/2) miles to a bus stop or two (2) miles to a school do not apply. Under the following conditions, students who reside within two (2) miles of the designated school may be eligible to ride the school bus:
    1. Special authorization is granted by the Superintendent or designee and may include students who meet the requirements for Hazardous Walking as determined by FS. 1006.23 or students granted transportation under other statutory provisions.
    2. A student who is classified as a student with disabilities under the Individual with Disabilities Act (IDEA) if transportation services are required by the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).
  6. A student who is eligible for transportation and resides beyond the accessibility of a school bus may be provided transportation by payment from the School Board to the parent(s) or legal guardian for use of a private automobile or other conveyance for this purpose.
  7. The School Board may cooperate with other school districts to provide transportation for students.
    1. When it is practical to extend a school bus route to serve any territory located in another school district, the School Board shall enter into an agreement with the School Board of the other district to provide transportation services to students residing in the adjacent school district. Any such agreement shall be recorded in the official School Board minutes of each school board. The agreement shall state in detail the responsibility of each school board for operating the school bus and maintaining a daily schedule.
    2. Whenever a school bus crosses a school district line, all rules of the School Board shall apply to students transported by the said School Board unless otherwise stated in the agreement between the school boards.
  8. Only a student who is regularly enrolled as a transported student shall be permitted to ride such bus while it is being operated on a regular school bus route. Approval shall not be allowed for student visitation, unless duly authorized; or for a student to obtain transportation to his/her regular place of employment.
  9. A student who arrives early or remains late because of transportation service shall be under school supervision at all times and shall, if practicable, have a planned schedule of activities. The principal shall be responsible for providing such supervision.
  10. The school principal or designated staff shall plan and assign places for students to get on and off the school buses at the school and ensures the safety of the loading and unloading zones while providing supervision of students.
  11. The school principal or designated staff shall assume responsibility for all student disciplinary cases which arise in connection with transporting students.
  12. Parents, guardians, and students will be informed annually of their responsibilities regarding student transportation as follows:
    1. Ensure the safe travel of students during the portions of each trip to and
      from school and home when the students are not under the custody and
      control of the District, including each trip to and from home and the
      assigned bus stop.
    2. Ensure that students ride only in their assigned school buses and get off at assigned stops, except when alternative buses or arrangements have been made, and only with written permission and authorized by school or District staff.
    3. Ensure that students are aware of and follow the Student Code of Conduct while the students are at school bus stops and to provide necessary supervision during the times when the bus is not present.
    4. Each student who is transported shall abide by the rules of safety and behavior necessary to operate the District’s transportation system. Serious infraction of these rules may result in the loss of the student’s privilege. The student’s parent(s) or legal guardian shall be responsible for making sure the student abides by the rules or for providing the student’s transportation. Suspension from a bus shall not affect the attendance laws and rules.
    5. Ensure that, when the physical disability of the student renders the student unable to get on and off the bus without assistance, the necessary assistance to help the student get on and off at the bus stop as required is provided.
    6. Ensure that the student arrives at the bus stop on time in the morning.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.21, 1006.22, 1006.23, 1011.68, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULES: 6A-3.001, 6A-3.0171 6A-3.0121
HISTORY: ADOPTED: MAY 26, 1999
REVISION DATE(S): JUNE 10, 2013; JUNE 13, 2011; APRIL 7, 2009; NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MAY 7, 2024 

FORMERLY: EEA

Back to Top


8.32 BUS ROUTES

  1. Designation of Bus Routes. The School Board, after considering the Superintendent's recommendation, shall make provision for and authorize school bus routes per the budgetary process and as detailed below within this policy and School Board Policy 8.30 – Student Transportation. Each route shall be planned to ensure safety, economy, and efficiency and shall meet the following requirements:
    1. The route shall be planned, scheduled, and adjusted to the capacity of the bus and, insofar as practicable, to the capacity of available equipment to serve students whose homes are beyond a reasonable walking distance from the school center to which they are assigned, except as otherwise provided by Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules.
    2. The routing and scheduling of buses shall be planned to eliminate the necessity for students to stand while the bus is in motion. In emergency situations where the number of transported students in a bus exceeds the rated seating capacity, the bus shall proceed at such a reduced rate of speed to maximize students' safety.
    3. School bus routes, insofar as possible, shall be restricted to those areas where road conditions, bridge capacities, and the number of transported students allow such service to be economically feasible and practicable.
    4. A route shall not be extended for the purpose of accommodating students whose homes are within a reasonable walking distance by a shorter or more economical route which is available to serve the students.
    5. School bus routes shall, insofar as possible, be restricted to main routes and all-weather roads and shall require a minimal time for any student to travel to and from school. An all-weather road is defined as a road with at least a twelve (12) foot clearance overhead from ground level and is:
      1. Free from safety hazards and passable under all weather conditions;
      2. Sufficiently wide so that tree limbs, bushes, and similar hazards do not exist;
      3. Free of obstructions and with bridges which are adequate to support the capacity of the bus when loaded; and,
      4. Open to the public and maintained at public expense.
    6. A suitable and safe place shall be provided through parental assistance for the bus to turn around. The turning area for the bus shall be sufficient for a bus of the size designated to serve the area to turn without the necessity of backing onto a roadway or creating a hazardous situation for students or resulting in damage to the bus.
    7. Bus stops shall be established as necessary at the most reasonably safe locations available at least one fourth (¼) of a mile apart, except when student's safety and welfare may be involved.
  2. Non-transportation Zones. The School Board shall designate, by map or otherwise, non-transportation zones based on the Superintendents recommendations. These represent areas in the District where transportation services are unnecessary or impracticable. Non-transportation zones shall be designated annually prior to the opening of school and prior to the designation of bus routes for the ensuing school year.
  3. Each route shall be planned insofar as practicable, so that no elementary student be on a bus more than fifty (50) minutes or secondary school student more than one (1) hour during the morning or evening.
  4. Spur Routes. A spur or loop route shall be made to serve students whose residences are more than one (1) mile from the main trunk route provided that:
    1. The distance from the student's home to the nearest point on the main trunk route of the bus serving the school that he/she is required or expected to attend is more than one (1) mile as measured by the nearest accessible route.
    2. The service can be provided by operating the bus over an all-weather road that is open to the public and maintained at public expense.
    3. A suitable and safe place is provided through parental assistance for the bus to turn around. The turning area for the bus shall be sufficient for a bus of the size designated to serve the area to turn without the necessity of backing onto a roadway or creating a hazardous situation for students or resulting in damage to the bus.
    4. A spur route or loop route for the convenience of students living in an isolated area shall be extended only to a point within one (1) mile of the student's home and not necessarily to the place of his/her residence if an adequate turning area for the bus is not available nearer to the home of the student who is farthest from the main trunk bus route.
  5. Magnet Routes.  Transportation may be provided to students who are enrolled in magnet schools and programs. Any secondary student who reside more than two (2) miles from his/her assigned school and is within the designated transportation zone according to School Board Policy 5.46 may ride the school bus to and from the school. Any elementry student who resides more than one and half (1 1/2) miles from his/her assigned school and is within the designated transportation zone according to School Board Policy 5.46 is eligible to ride the school bus to and from school. Stops may be established primarily at or near Duval County public schools. The distance to a bus stop for magnet students may exceed two (2) miles for secondary students and one and a half (1 1/2) mile for elementry students. Annually magnet routes will be reviewed for ridership. Magnet trips with 10 or less magnet students may be discontinued the following school year.
  6. Routing on Both Sides of a Roadway. Bus routes may be designed for students to be picked up and unloaded without the necessity of crossing the roadway if it is divided by a raised barrier or an unpaved median at least five (5) feet wide. Buses shall be routed to eliminate the necessity of making a "U" turn on the main traveled portion of the roadway.
    1. Necessary "U" turns shall be made either by the bus leaving the road at a safe place, turning around, and reentering the roadway, or by making a "U" turn where the width of the median strip exceeds the length of the bus.
    2. If the roadway has a controlled crossing site (crossing guard, traffic enforcement officer, stop sign, or other traffic control signal) routes will not be planned for both sides of a roadway.
  7. Change in Routes. The School Board authorizes the Director of Transportation to accept and consider requests for a change in a bus route and to make changes in a bus route for good cause.
  8. Route Review. An annual school route review shall be conducted prior to each school year. This review shall include criteria established for the safety and efficiency of bus routes.
  9. Periodically student walking conditions to and from school shall be reviewed to determine if hazardous conditions exist in accordance with FS. 1006.23. Appropriate requests for designation of hazardous conditions shall be provided as required by state law or State Board of Education rules.
  10. Schedule of Bus Routes. School bus drivers shall place the bus stop and time schedules on board the bus, shall amend the schedule as authorized by the Director of Transportation, and shall observe the schedule except when hazardous conditions exist.
  11. The Superintendent is directed to ensure that School Board liability is protected when transporting students and persons other than students to events or activities in which the School Board or school has agreed to participate or co-sponsor.
  12. An accident report shall be prepared immediately after an accident involving a bus or school passenger. The Director of Transportation shall insure the appropriate forms are completed and filed in accordance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 947.1405, 1001.42, 1001.43, 1006.22, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171, 6A-3.001
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; APRIL 7, 2009; JUNE 13, 2011; JUNE 10, 2013; SEPTEMBER 1, 2015; JULY 12, 2021; JULY 10, 2023; MAY 7, 2024

FORMERLY: EEAC

Back to Top


8.33 BUS EMERGENCY EVACUATION DRILLS

  1. Emergency evacuation drills shall be planned and directed by each school principal or designee on each bus serving the school during the first six (6) weeks of each semester, for students who are transported to facilitate rapid, safe, and orderly evacuation off the buses in case of emergency. Documentation shall be at the school and Transportation Department office.
  2. All school bus operators transporting students, teacher, or chaperones on field trips and activity trips shall instruct passengers in the locations and proper use of school bus emergency exits prior to each such trip.
  3. Each school principal or designee shall provide instruction during the first six (6) weeks of the first semester of the school year for all transported students in safe practices to board and depart from the school bus. The principal and his/her instructional staff members shall determine the most effective and practical manner in which to provide such instruction.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1006.21, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.017
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): OCTOBER 2, 2012; NOVEMBER 10, 2008

FORMERLY: EEAE

Back to Top


8.34 SAFETY BELTS OR OTHER RESTRAINT SYSTEMS

  1. Each school bus that is purchased new after December 31, 2000, and used to transport students in grades Pre-K through 12 must be equipped with safety belts or with any other restraint system approved by the Federal Government in a number sufficient to allow each student who is being transported to use a separate safety belt or restraint system.
  2. Each school bus that was purchased prior to December 31, 2000 is not required to be equipped with safety belts.
  3. Safety belts on a school bus must meet standards required under s. 316.614 F.S.
  4. Each passenger on a school bus that is equipped with safety belts or restraint system shall wear a properly adjusted and fastened safety belt at all times while the bus is in operation. The Student Code of Conduct references failure to utilize safety equipment as an offense.
  5. School bus operators shall wear a seat belt when operating a school bus.
  6. Belt cutters meeting Florida School Bus specifications must be provided on any school bus equipped with passenger securement or restraint straps.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.21, 316.003, 316.614, 316.6145, F.S, 49 CFR 571.208
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171, 6A-3.0121
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 

FORMERLY: EB

Back to Top


8.35 SCHOOL BUS OPERATORS

  1. Each school bus operator shall possess the minimum qualifications prescribed in Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules.
  2. Each school bus operator shall assume responsibilities as outlined in State Board of Education Rule, Chapter 6A-3.0171.
  3. The use of a wireless communication device by any school bus operator while actively driving the bus is prohibited. Active driving is defined in the District Safe Driver Plan.
  4. Unnecessary idling of school buses (as prescribed by transportation procedures) while in the vicinity of students is prohibited.
  5. School bus operators or attendants of a bus shall remain with the bus so that students on board will be under supervision at all times, except to call for assistance in the case of an emergency or accident involving the students on the bus.
  6. In cases where a student with physical disabilities is unable to leave the area of a student stop without assistance, the school bus operator shall not assume responsibility for such assistance except in an emergency which threatens the safety of the student(s).
  7. School bus operators and attendants shall be provided training related to students; however, the operator and attendant shall not give medicine and shall limit assistance to that which would be expected of a reasonable, prudent person or as specified in an Individual Education Plan (IEP).
  8. School bus operators shall inspect the bus at least daily prior to the beginning of the first daily trip or more often as required to report any defect affecting safety or economy of operation immediately to authorized service personnel. A complete interior inspection of each bus after each run and trip should be performed to ensure no students are left on board.
  9. School bus operators shall wear a seat belt when operating a school bus.
  10. All procedures incorporated in the Florida Department of Education Basic School Bus Operator’s Curriculum shall be observed.
  11. School bus operators shall comply with the District Safe Driver Plan in matters of school bus operator certification.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, 1001.43, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1006.21, 1006.22, 1006.24, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0121, 6A-3.0141, 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 10, 2008
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 2, 2019; OCTOBER 7, 2014 

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.36 TRANSPORTING STUDENTS IN PRIVATE VEHICLES

  1. TRANSPORTING STUDENTS TO AND FROM SCHOOL IN PRIVATE VEHICLES
    The School Board may authorize the use of motor vehicles other than school buses to transport students to and from school only according to the provisions of Section 1006.22, Florida Statutes and applicable State Board of Education Rules.
  2. Except as provided in section I. above, authorization for transportation of students in privately owned vehicles may be given on a case by case basis only as follows:
    1. When a student is ill or injured and must be taken home or to a medical treatment facility under nonemergency circumstances; and the parent cannot be contacted or is unable to provide transportation.
    2. Adult supervision is available at the location to which the student is being transported.
    3. Approval has been given by the highest ranking school administrator available.
    4. Continued attempts must be made to contact the parent or guardian prior to transportation.
  3. TRANSPORTING STUDENTS IN PRIVATE VEHICLES FOR EDUCATIONAL FIELD TRIPS OR SCHOOL-SPONSORED OR SCHOOL-RELATED EVENTS.
    The transportation of students in privately-owned motor vehicles for educational field trips or school-sponsored or school-related events may be approved by the principal when it is determined by the principal that transportation by a school bus (one which is in daily service and is included in the state fleet database) is impractical. Such transportation in a privately-owned vehicle (other than an emergency situation) shall only be approved under the following circumstances:
    1. The vehicle must be a passenger car or multipurpose passenger vehicle or truck, as defined in 49 C.F.R., part 571, designed to transport fewer than 10 students.
    2. The driver of an authorized vehicle transporting students must maintain a valid driver’s license and must comply with the requirements of the District Safe Driver Plan.
    3. Students must be transported in designated seating positions and shall be required to use the occupant crash protection system provided by the vehicle manufacturer unless the student’s physical condition prohibits such use.
    4. The school principal shall have on file parental approval for each student participating in such trip which shall specifically state that the parent gives permission for the student to be transported in a private vehicle, that the district has assessed neither the driver nor condition of the vehicle, that the parent will hold the district and all its agents harmless for any and all injuries or property damage sustained by the student as a result of such transportation, and shall name the person who will be driving that private vehicle.
    5. Any private vehicles used to transport students under this policy shall be currently registered in the state of Florida, be insured for personal injury protection and property damage liability in at least the minimum amounts required by law, and be stated by the owner to be in good working order. A person wishing to transport students in a private vehicle will request approval by submitting his/her driver’s license, vehicle registration and insurance I.D. card, to the principal in a reasonable amount of time before the planned travel.
      The principal will examine the driver’s license, vehicle registration and insurance card, and may, in his or her discretion, give approval for the transportation of students in the private vehicles as requested. A student who is transported to any activity in a private vehicle approved under this policy shall return from the activity in the same vehicle, unless the student is released to his/her parent or guardian. In no case shall a person under 18 years of age or currently a student be allowed to drive a vehicle transporting other students. In no case shall a student be required to travel in a private vehicle; in the event district transportation is not available, alternative activities will be made available for any student that does not wish to travel in a private vehicle.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.43, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.21, 1006.22, 1006.24, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; JULY 12, 2021

FORMERLY: EEAG

Back to Top


8.37 SEAT BELTS IN MOTOR VEHICLES

  1. The operator and each passenger of a motor vehicle who are conducting School Board business or attending a school-related activity shall be restrained by a safety belt when the vehicle is in motion. This provision is applicable to all vehicles as defined in Florida Statutes, except for the following:
    1. A school bus;
    2. A bus used for transportation of persons for compensation;
    3. A farm tractor or implement of husbandry;
    4. A truck having a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,000 pounds; and,
    5. A motorcycle, moped, or bicycle.
  2. The number of passengers of a pickup truck required to wear a safety belt shall not exceed the number of safety belts which were installed by the manufacturer.
  3. Failure of an employee to wear a seat belt in a district vehicle or failure to require non-employee passengers to wear a seat belt may be cause for discipline.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 316.003, 316.614, 1001.43, 1006.21, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017;JULY 12, 2021

FORMERLY: EB

Back to Top


8.38 AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT USE AND MAINTENANCE

  1. PERSONAL USE OF DISTRICT-OWNED VEHICLE
    The Superintendent or designee may assign certain employees the responsibility of driving a District-owned, operated, or controlled vehicle to their residence after school hours. This shall be an employment condition and the vehicle shall only be driven to the employee's residence or an approved work center and returned to the school or work center for use during the duty day. The use of District-owned vehicles for personal use shall be prohibited.
  2. MAINTENANCE OF DISTRICT-OWNED VEHICLES
    All automotive equipment owned by the School Board shall be assigned to the Superintendent or designee for proper care and maintenance.
    1. Automotive equipment shall be used exclusively for school business. It shall not be used for unauthorized purposes.
      1. The Superintendent shall report any unauthorized equipment usage to the School Board.
      2. Violation of this rule shall be cause for disciplinary action.
    2. Failure of the operator to notify the District’s Fleet Services office as to any mechanical defect of any piece of automotive equipment may be cause for disciplinary action by the School Board.
    3. All mechanical defects of equipment, where repairs are needed, shall be the Superintendent’s or designee’s responsibility and repairs shall be made immediately; provided that the vehicle may be withdrawn from use by the Superintendent until the repairs are made. The School Board shall not assume any financial responsibility for purchases or contract for repairs unless prior approval is obtained from the Superintendent or designee.
    4. The Director of Consolidated Services shall determine that all equipment is inspected at regular intervals. The equipment shall be placed in the District’s approved garage(s) for repairs or service if needed.
    5. Under no conditions shall equipment be repaired by a private shop or private individual without approval of the Superintendent, his/her designee or Director of Consolidated Services.
    6. The person who is assigned a vehicle on a full time basis shall be responsible for delivering the vehicle to the District’s approved garage for inspection as prescribed.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1006.21, 1006.22, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 2, 2019; NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017.

FORMERLY: EEB

Back to Top


8.39 VEHICLE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

  1. School buses, which meet all provisions of Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules, shall be maintained in safe operating condition. The Director of Transportation or his/her designee shall be responsible for a planned program of maintenance to keep all vehicles running safely and efficiently. This program shall include:
    1. Instructing bus operators in methods of anticipating, noting, and reporting maintenance problems.
    2. Inspecting and servicing all vehicles as prescribed in State Board of Education rules on a periodic basis.
    3. Maintaining service and repair records on each vehicle as required by State Board of Education rules. A checklist shall be devised for use in recording the results of the safety inspection.
    4. Planning and scheduling preventive maintenance, through major overhaul and repair of all equipment.
    5. Training through in-service activities for apprentice mechanics.
  2. School bus inspections shall be conducted by technicians certified as school bus inspectors in accordance with the State of Florida School Bus Safety Inspection Manual. Any school bus which does not comply with the requirements of Florida Statutes and State Board of Education rules shall be withdrawn immediately from use until it meets such requirements.
  3. The School Board shall maintain appropriate school bus replacement programs to assure appropriate maintenance of the bus fleet.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.21, 1006.22, 1006.25, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008
FORMERLY: EEAEB

Back to Top


8.40 BUSES OR OTHER COMMON CARRIER FOR EXTRACURRICULAR AND FIELD TRIPS

  1. A school principal may contract with a school bus owner for transporting students to school-sponsored activities in which they are required or expected to attend. The school bus owner shall hold a valid contract with the School Board for the transportation of students to and from school.
  2. A school principal may contract with a common carrier to transport students to school-sponsored activities. Each common carrier shall be approved through the District Transportation office. The District Risk Management office shall review, establish, and approve the insurance required of common carriers for the protection of students.
  3. No person shall be eligible for transportation on a field trip or extracurricular school trip unless he/she is authorized in writing by the principal or designee.
  4. Extracurricular and field trips shall not interfere with the normal transportation of
    students to or from school.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1006.21, 1006.22, 1006.24, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-3.0171
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 

FORMERLY: EEAFA

Back to Top


8.41 USE AND CARE OF DRIVER EDUCATION VEHICLES

The Director of Afterschool Programs is responsible for the driver education vehicles assigned to the designated school. The Director shall adhere to the following provisions.

  1. All vehicles shall be removed from the road when school is closed for the day and shall be placed in the designated place approved by the Superintendent or designee. In all instances, vehicles shall be parked on School
    Board property overnight unless the vehicle is being repaired or serviced at an authorized repair facility.
  2. The use of the vehicle for administrative purposes, field trips, or extended trips shall be prohibited. The use of driver education vehicles shall be limited strictly to driver education instruction on a driver education range or on the street driving phase of such instruction, except when the vehicle is being repaired or serviced.
  3. Vehicles shall be taken for service checks as directed by the Superintendent or designee.
  4. The Driver Education Licensing Assistance Program (DELAP) instructors and the Director of Afteschool Programs shall be responsible for keeping the vehicle’s maintenance and appearance clean at all times.
  5. No person shall be permitted to smoke or consume food or liquids while in driver education vehicles.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S. LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.54, 1003.48, 1012.28, F.S. STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.052, 6A-3.0171 HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997 REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MAY 3, 2022; JULY 10, 2023 FORMERLY: IHAN

Back to Top


8.42 GENERAL FOOD SERVICE REQUIREMENTS

  1. The school food service program shall operate according to requirements set forth in Florida Statutes and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) rules and applicable federal laws. The school food service program shall include the federally reimbursed breakfast and lunch program, summer feeding program, a la carte food, beverage offerings, and sale of food and beverage items offered through vending machines or other methods to students at all school facilities during the school day and may include other federally reimbursed Child Nutrition Programs.
  2. The school food service program shall be an integral part of the District’s educational program, offering nutritional and educational opportunities to students.
  3. The school food service program shall be primarily for the benefit of students and shall be operated on a nonprofit basis. School meal prices shall be established by the School Board and may be changed as required to cover operational costs. Free and reduced price meals shall be provided in accordance with federal regulations.
  4. Foods and beverages available in schools shall be only those which meet the nutritional needs of students and contribute to the development of desirable health habits unless permitted otherwise by FDACS rules and approved by the Superintendent.
  5. The school food service program shall meet the standards for Food Service and Sanitation and Safety as provided by the Florida State Board of Health and FDACS.
  6. The school principal, with the cooperation of the school staff, shall be responsible for operating the school food service program in compliance with federal and state laws, FDACS rules, and School Board policies.
  7. Records and receipts shall be maintained when United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) commodities are received. USDA commodities shall not be used in any manner that violates federal regulations.
  8. The Superintendent or designee shall develop a written procedures manual to govern school food and nutritional services programs.
  9. The School Board shall establish annually the sale price of student and adult meals and shall operate the food service program on a nonprofit basis. Students shall pay the established price for the meal, except as federal regulations permit the serving of a free or reduced price meal.
  10. The sale of food and beverage items to students on campus, during the school day, including a la carte items in the cafeteria during federal meal programs, must meet the requirements of FDACS Rule number 5P-1.003 (Smart Snacks Rule). All food sold on campus between midnight and 30 minutes after the end of the school
    day must comply with nutrition standards including the Smart Snacks Rule. Foodbased fundraisers may not be operated until 30 minutes after the last lunch service ends and must also meet the nutritional requirements of the Smart Snack Rule. Foods sold off campus, after 30 minutes after the end of the last lunch period, and to adults, are not affected by the Smart Snacks rule. Proceeds from the sale of food and beverage items during the school day shall accrue to the food service program or to a school organization approved by the School Board. Schools or related organizations selling any food items shall adhere to the District Approved Wellness Policy.
  11. Buy American: We shall adhere to Title 7 CFR 210.21(d) to ensure compliance with the Buy American provisions. In the event a non-domestic agricultural product is to be provided, the vendor must obtain, in advance, written approval of the product to be used.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.43, CHAPTER 595, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES RULE(S): CHAPTER 5P-1
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015; JULY 12, 2021; DECEMBER 7, 2021

FORMERLY: EF, EFAA, EFD, EFE

Back to Top


8.44 MEAL PATTERNS

  1. All schools with grades PreK-12 shall participate in the National School Breakfast Program and the National School Lunch Program and shall serve student breakfasts and lunches according to meal patterns established by the United States Department of Agriculture.
  2. Schools may participate in the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). Such meals shall be served to students according to meal patterns established by the United States Department of Agriculture.
  3. Schools may participate in the After School Meal Program (AMP). Such meals shall be served to students according to meal patterns established by the Florida Department of Health.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.41, 1006.06, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-7.040
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; JULY 2, 2019; JULY 12, 2021

FORMERLY: EF

Back to Top


8.45 WELLNESS POLICY

  1. The Duval County School Board recognizes the important role wellness plays in achieving high levels of student achievement and employee success in the workplace.
    1. OVERALL WELLNESS GOALS. The District is committed to providing a school and work environment that enhances the learning and development of lifelong wellness practices of each student and staff member and providing guidance in the areas of nutrition, health, physical activity and food service.
    2. The Board subscribes to the following:
      1. Nutrition programs will be compliant with federal, state and local requirements, including the provisions of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, and will be accessible to all students. An economically sustainable meal program is available to every student at every school. Students are encouraged to eat healthy and participate in school meal programs, so they are prepared to learn and reach their fullest potential.
      2. All foods and beverages made available for sale on school campuses during the school day will meet nutrition requirements, including vending, concessions, student stores, and fundraising.
      3. Schools will provide a safe, comfortable, pleasing environment, and allow ample time and space for eating meals.
      4. There will be no withholding of food and/or physical activity as a punishment, nor shall either be used as an incentive or reward.
      5. Fundraising efforts will promote only non-food items, foods that meet the nutritional guidelines, and/or healthy physical activities.
      6. School and class celebrations may be held with the permission of the school principal, in moderation. The frequency and timing of school and class celebrations shall be established by each school principal. Celebrations authorized by the principal should be held during or after the scheduled lunch time whenever possible. Parents and staff are strongly encouraged to provide items that are non-food or snacks that meet the nutritional guidelines.
      7. Teachers, principals, and food service employees will recognize that the lunch period is an integral part of the educational program.
      8. Nutrition education will be provided and promoted through comprehensive health education and food service.
      9. Physical activity will be provided every day for students before, during and/or after school.
      10. Students will be encouraged to engage in additional physical activity, including athletics, intramurals, co and extra-curricular activities.
      11. District and school communications will be used to educate families and the community about health, nutrition, and physical activity.
  2. The Wellness Program shall include, but not be limited to, the following components:
    1. Involvement of parents, students, representatives of the contracted district food service program, school board members, teachers including health education and physical education teachers, school health professionals, school administrators, support staff, district administrators, and the public in the development, implementation, review, and update of the program;
    2. Establishment of a fully functioning School Health Advisory Council (SHAC), which operates according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as outlined in FS 381.0056, Coordinated School Health (CSH) program model (including but not limited to matters pertaining to health education, physical education and physical activity, health services, nutrition environment and services, social and emotional climate, counseling, psychological & social services, physical environment, employee wellness, community involvement, and family engagement) to oversee the implementation of the Wellness Program. The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model is an expansion and update of the CSH approach. The WSCC incorporates the components of CSH and the tenets of the whole child approach to strengthen a unified and collaborative approach to learning and health.
      1. District SHAC Committee: Following the WSCC model, with the purposes of monitoring the implementation of this policy, evaluating policy progress, and revising the policy as necessary, the District SHAC committee will be established and will meet monthly with recommended committee membership to include representation from the following groups:
        1. Food Service
        2. Parents and/or Students
        3. Elementary and/or Secondary Schools
        4. School Board
        5. District Physical Education
        6. District Health Education
        7. School Health Advisory Council
        8. District Medical Director and/or School Nurse Manager
        9. District Athletics
        10. Other community representatives
      2. Through community partnerships and participation, this committee will communicate monthly with the public via updates to the District website, public meetings, and sharing of information.
      3. Functioning sub-committees of the SHAC may include, but are not limited to:
        1. Health Education/Physical Education/Activity
        2. School Health Services
        3. Family and Community Engagement (FACE)
    3. Establishment of Healthy School Teams at each school and Wellness Committees at other District worksites to oversee the implementation of the Wellness Programs as required by law.
      1. School-Based Healthy School Teams and Worksite Wellness Teams:
        1. Healthy School Teams are established at each school and will meet a minimum of two times annually for the purpose of monitoring compliance with this Wellness Policy.
        2. Schools are encouraged to model the membership of the team after the CDC’s Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model, including, but not limited to a teacher, parent, school administrator, school nurse, school counselor, food service representative, student, other non certificated staff member, community/business partner.
        3. Healthy School Teams will conduct a review of their respective schools at least once per year to identify areas for improvement, report their findings, and develop a plan of action as they relate to this Wellness Policy and school wellness goals.
        4. Healthy School Team action plans should align with the School Improvement Plan and be consistent with the goals of this Wellness Policy.
        5. It is also recommended that non-school based worksites establish “Worksite Wellness Teams” to oversee the health and wellness related activities at each District worksite.
    4. Goals for nutrition promotion and education, physical activity and other school-based activities that are designed to promote student wellness are established by a review and consideration of evidence-based strategies and techniques, including a review of Smarter Lunchroom tools and techniques:
      1. Nutrition Education - Health and Nutrition Literacy: All students and staff will be encouraged to make health-enhancing choices through the promotion of nutrition education and other health competencies.
        1. Health literacy education will be incorporated into classroom instruction to include comprehensive concepts on health-enhancing behaviors, risk factor reduction for life-style disease prevention, bullying and violence prevention, personal safety, identifying and managing stress, and sexual health and body language.
        2. Nutrition education is a component of comprehensive health education and can be integrated through classroom teachers, physical education teachers, counselors and school nurses in schools that do not have a certified health education teacher and should include lessons and experimental learning opportunities that enhance learning. Specific guidelines pertaining to nutrition education shall be set forth in the Student Progression Plan and District Wellness Procedures Manual, maintained in the Office of District Wellness.
        3. Nutrition education should involve the sharing of information, marketing of healthy food and beverages, and promotion of healthy behaviors with staff, families and community to
          positively impact overall health and wellness through the District website and various wellness activities.
        4. Health literacy resources will be available for staff focusing on concepts of health enhancing behaviors, risk factor reduction for disease prevention, personal safety and managing stress through the District website and communications from the wellness office to ambassadors.
        5. The District will develop and implement a Food Allergy Management and Prevention Plan for schools and district offices that includes the following components:
          1. Ensures provisions are in place for the daily management of food allergies through individualized student plans and procedures that assist children manage food allergies, reduce the risk of exposure, and encourage student self-management;
          2. Prepares staff to respond to food allergy emergencies through communication systems, access to appropriate medical supplies and equipment, staff training, and clear reporting procedures;
          3. Provides for general training for all staff and individualized training to staff in regular contact with students with food allergies;
          4. Provides information, resources, food sharing guidelines, and school policies regarding food allergies to all students and their families; and
          5. Maintains a safe, healthy, positive educational environment for all students, including those with food allergies, that reduces bullying and social isolation.
        6. At the secondary school level, Health Education courses shall be taught by certified Health Education teachers as a separate course and shall be set forth in the Student Progression Plan.
      2. Nutrition Promotion: Nutrition promotion can positively influence lifelong eating behaviors by creating food environments that encourage healthy choices and encourage participation in the school meal programs.
        1. The school environment, including the cafeteria and classroom, shall provide clear and consistent messages that promote and reinforce healthy eating;
        2. Students have access to useful nutrition information. Posters, worksheets, and brochures will be available in classrooms and throughout each school campus;
        3. Schools will provide parents with healthy snack ideas, lists of food alternatives for healthy celebrations and opportunities for physical activity before and after school.
      3. Physical Education: The District will provide evidenced-based physical education programs based on the district Student Progress Plan, National Standards, and Florida State Standards that enable students to develop healthy lifetime habits that promote physical activity with the objective of improving wellness and academic achievement. Specific guidelines pertaining to physical education shall be set forth in the District Wellness Procedures Manual, maintained in the Office of District Wellness.
      4. Physical Activity: Students are encouraged to participate in the nationally recommended levels of physical activity each day (minimum of sixty minutes daily).
        1. Recess periods for elementary grades shall be provided according to section 1003.455, Florida Statutes, and not be counted towards the 150 minutes of weekly physical education.
          1. Recess is defined as safe, unstructured play time that is supervised, but not directed by adults;
          2. Schools are encouraged to schedule recess prior to lunch due to research that supports that physical activity prior to lunch can increase nutrient intake, decrease discipline referrals and have an increase in classroom time on-task;
          3. Students shall not be denied recess as a form of discipline; and
          4. Students shall not be encouraged with physical activity or recess as a form of reward.
        2. Students will be informed of the opportunity to participate in physical activity in before and after school programs and school intramural programs.
        3. Physical activity breaks shall be integrated across curricula and throughout the school day, movement shall be made a part of health, science, math, social studies, language arts and other electives for students and staff.
        4. Schools are encouraged to engage in community and corporate partnerships to support and enhance physical activity for students.
        5. Schools are encouraged to engage in various community and corporate partnerships to support and enhance physical activity for staff to model for students.
        6. Physical activity and events that promote an active lifestyle will be supported by school wellness committees.
        7. Professional development for staff will be offered over the summer and as requested throughout the year.
        8. To coordinate school-wide efforts, the District encourages each site to develop a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) to be overseen by the Healthy School Team.
      5. Other School-Based Activities
        1. The goals outlined by this policy will be considered in planning all school-based activities before, during and after school, including field trips, dances, and assemblies.
        2. Support for the health of all students is demonstrated by hosting health fairs, health screenings, and helping to enroll eligible children in state health insurance programs.
        3. The District will coordinate with PTAs and/or SACs to develop a family-based after-school healthy activities programs, including activities such as family fitness nights and walking programs.
    5. Goals for nutrition promotion and education, physical activity and other activities that are designed to promote employee wellness:
      1. Nutrition Education: Nutrition resources will be promoted through regular communication with school/worksite wellness ambassadors, administrators, and staff.
      2. Physical Activity: Staff will be informed and encouraged to participate in physical activity, including before, during and after school/work programs such as intramurals, community events, and other physical challenges.
      3. Other School and Worksite Activities: Appropriate referrals will be made as requested for various programs and resources, including but not limited to the Employee Assistance Program, Diabetes Prevention/Management Program(s), Smoking Cessation Program(s), Weight Loss/Management Program(s). Onsite, offsite and on-line programs and resources will be made available to staff members, including but not limited to flu shots, health screenings and a variety of health and wellness topics.
    6. Nutrition guidelines for all foods available on each school campus and all District facilities during the school/work day.
      1. Nutrition and Food Service: The District follows guidelines set forth by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) in administering nutrition and food service programs, including the provisions set forth in the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act.
        1. USDA Competitive Food Regulations (Smart Snacks) and Rule 5P-1.003, F.A.C., are used to guide the District for food and beverage sales. Information for these standards and more will be kept updated on the District website.
        2. Schools will strive to increase participation in the federally funded child nutrition programs (i.e. school lunch, school breakfast, after-school snack, and summer food service programs).
        3. Information for the USDA National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program, including information on eligibility of services for programs will remain updated on the District’s website.
        4. Menus meet nutrition standards, conform to appropriate menu planning principles, and are created/reviewed by a Registered Dietician.
        5. Students will be given the opportunity to provide input on local, cultural, and ethnic foods.
        6. School and food service staff encourage students to choose and consume full meals.
        7. School meal programs adhere to appropriate dietary guidelines pertaining to portion size, fiber, trans- and saturated fat, sodium and sugar.
        8. Accommodations are made for students with special dietary needs, and guidelines are provided to schools regarding management of food allergies in schools.
        9. A la carte offerings to students meet nutrition guidelines and can be selected with input from students, parents and staff.
        10. School operated vending machines are outlined in the National School Lunch Act - Competitive Foods Rule.
        11. The District shall operate and provide food service in accordance with USDA’s National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards and applicable laws and regulations of the state of Florida. The guidelines for reimbursable school meals shall not be less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by USDA, and are provided in the Wellness Procedures Manual, maintained in the Office of District Wellness.
        12. School-based marketing will be consistent with policies for nutrition education that meet or exceed USDA’s Smart Snacks in school nutrition standards. Food and beverage marketing is defined as advertising and other promotions in schools. Food and beverage marketing often includes an oral,
          written, or graphic statements made for the purpose of promoting the sale of a food or beverage product made by the producer, manufacturer, seller or any other entity with a commercial interest in the product. As the District/school nutrition services/Athletics Department/PTA/PTO reviews existing contracts and considers new contracts, equipment and product purchasing (and replacement) decisions should reflect the applicable marketing guidelines established by the District wellness policy.
  3. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall establish a Wellness Program for staff and students to assist in the implementation of the Wellness Policy that shall also include:
    1. A plan for implementing the goals of the programs; with objectives to promote student and employee health and fitness, reduce obesity, and prevent/manage chronic diseases;
    2. A plan for measuring the compliance/implementation of the Wellness programs to share information with school community and various stakeholders via the District website;
    3. A plan for evaluating the outcomes of the Wellness Programs; and
    4. A plan for updating and modifying the Wellness Programs based on the results of the annual review and triennial assessments and/or as local priorities change, community needs change, wellness goals are met, new health information and technology emerges and new federal or state guidance or standards are issued. The wellness policy will be assessed as indicated at least every three years following the triennial assessment.
  4. The program shall meet requirements of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act of 1966, The Federal Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and all Florida statutes and administrative rules.
  5. The Superintendent shall deliver a report during the month of July to the Board summarizing the goals and outcomes of the prior school year related to this Policy.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: HEALTHY HUNGER-FREE KIDS ACT (THE ACT) P.L. 111-296 CHILD NUTRITION CT REAUTHORIZATION 2010 P.L. 108-265, SECTION 204 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH ACT (42 USC 1751 et seq.) CHILD NUTRITION ACT OF 1966 (42 USC 1771 et seq.) 381.0056, 1003.453, 1003.455, 1001.43, Chapter 595, F.S. STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES RULE(S): Chapter 5P-1
HISTORY: ADOPTED: JUNE 6, 2006
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MAY 4, 2010; SEPTEMBER 6, 2011; OCTOBER 2, 2012; MARCH 3, 2015; JUNE 6, 2017; MARCH 6, 2018; NOVEMBER 7, 2018

FORMERLY: EF, EFAA, EFD, EFE

Back to Top


8.46 USE OF FOOD FACILITIES

  1. Any organization desiring to use the cafeteria shall obtain written permission from the principal who shall notify the District Food Service personnel of such authorization and shall complete a Building Utilization Authorization Form. The use of the kitchen and/or kitchen equipment for any use other than for the use of a United States Department of Agriculture Child Nutrition Program (USDA Nutrition Program) is not permitted, including equipment at the District Nutrition Center. During a declared state or federal emergency, such kitchen equipment may be utilized pursuant to United States Department of Agriculture rules and regulations.
  2. Any school or community event sponsor or vendor who uses school facilities shall notify the local public health unit not less than three (3) days prior to a scheduled school carnival, fair, or other celebration involving the sale of food or beverages, using non-USDA Nutrition Program equipment.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1002.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: Chapter 595, F.S. STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES RULE(S): Chapter 5P-1
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 2, 2019; NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015 

FORMERLY: EF

Back to Top


8.48 FREE AND REDUCED MEALS

Free or reduced price meals shall be served to all students who are unable to pay the full price of meals and who qualify based on eligibility criteria approved by federal regulations.

  1. The income Eligibility Guidelines for free or reduced price meals shall be in accordance with the scales provided by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) as adopted by the State Board of Education based upon income guidelines prescribed by the United States Secretary of Agriculture.
  2. Eligibility criteria shall be applicable to all District schools and shall provide that all students from a family meeting the eligibility criteria and attending any District school are offered the same benefits.
  3. In accordance with Florida statute, Universal-free school breakfast meals shall be made available to all students in each elementary, middle, and high school in which 80% or more of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Where economically feasible within the food service program, Universal-free school breakfast shall be made available to all students when the free and reduced eligibility exceeds 75% at given school.
  4. Procedures for implementing the free and reduced price meal services shall be reviewed annually and shall be in accordance with procedures and guidelines published by the Florida Department of Education and the United States Department of Agriculture.
  5. The District shall annually provide to all students in each elementary, middle, and high school information prepared by the district’s food service administration regarding its school breakfast programs. The information shall be communicated through school announcements and written notice sent to all parents.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.42, 1001.43, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, Chapter 595, F.S. STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES RULE(S): Chapter 5P-1
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 1, 2008; NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015

FORMERLY: EFC

Back to Top


8.49 SUMMER NUTRITION PROGRAM

  1. The District will sponsor a summer nutrition program each year. One (1) site shall be within five (5) miles of an elementary school at which fifty percent (50%) of the students qualify for free or reduced price school meals and shall operate for a minimum of thirty-five (35) consecutive days. The remaining sites shall be within ten (10) miles of each elementary school at which fifty percent (50%) of the students qualify for free or reduced price school meals. The Superintendent may collaborate with governmental agencies and not-for-profit entities in implementing this plan.
  2. The School Board may seek an exemption from sponsoring a summer nutrition program as provided by law. No annual School Board action is required unless the School Board desires to be exempt from providing a summer nutrition program. A District School Board seeking such exemption must include the issue on an agenda at a regular or special District School Board Meeting that is publicly noticed, provide residents an opportunity to participate in the discussion, and vote on whether to be exempt from this section. The School Board shall notify the Commissioner of Education within ten (10) days of the decision to continue the exemption.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, Chapter 595, F.S. STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES RULE(S): Chapter 5P-1
HISTORY: ADOPTED: November 10, 2008
REVISION DATE(S): OCTOBER 1, 2013; MARCH 3, 2015

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.50 EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES PLANNING

  1. The District has a primary responsibility to provide school facilities that address changing enrollment patterns and sustain high quality educational programs in a way that meets its policies. The Board fulfills this responsibility through the facilities planning process.
    1. This Long-Range Educational Facilities Planning Policy provides direction on how the capital planning process should be conducted and prescribes criteria and standards to guide planning. This process is designed to promote public understanding of planning for the District and to encourage community members, local government agencies and municipalities to identify and communicate their priorities and concerns to the Superintendent and Board.
    2. The Board recognizes the interrelationship of its facilities planning policy with other policies, such as those on educational programs, magnet schools and programs and attendance boundaries. Each of these factors is substantially affected by a policy which attempts to ensure that enrollment is appropriate to facility capacity.
    3. Enrollment changes in the District do not occur at a uniform rate through the county. Accordingly, there shall be an enrollment review in accordance with Board Policy 5.44 School Attendance Boundaries. The District shall develop enrollment projections for all schools no less than every five years for at least a five year period. These forecasts will be the basis for evaluating facility space and initiating planning activities. The forecasts should be developed utilizing the City of Jacksonville Planning Department’s county population forecast, other pertinent demographic data, and state cohort projections.
    4. The School Board, pursuant to Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, shall enter into an Interlocal Agreement with the City of Jacksonville to coordinate and cooperate, to the greatest extent practicable, the implementation of the School Board's plans for the construction, remodeling, renovation and opening of public educational facilities.
  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF PRIORITIES FOR FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT
    The following order of needs is established for allocating resources for facilities,
    human resources, funds, and materials and shall be adhered to without special
    consideration:
    1. Conditions adversely affecting the health and safety of occupants;
    2. Conditions which may close a school or result in serious damage to the facility;
    3. Conditions adversely affecting the educational goals of the School Board;
    4. Space for expansion of school programs to meet special needs and changing conditions in educational curriculum;
    5. Space for extra class activities, recreational, and community activities
  3. DISTRICT EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES PLAN
    1. The Superintendent shall direct the development of a District Educational Facilities Plan, which shall be a complete, balanced, financially feasible capital outlay financial plan for the district. The plan will set forth the proposed commitments and planned expenditures to address the educational needs and provide for adequate maintenance of the educational plant facilities. The District Educational Facilities Plan shall be
      adopted by the Board annually prior to the adoption of the district’s annual capital outlay plan budget. On or about May 1 of each year, the Superintendent will publish a District Educational Facilities Plan for the District. This plan will include recommendations and the necessary balanced budget for facilities for the coming five fiscal years and shall include the following:
      1. Enrollment projections for the next five years for each school based upon demographic data and projected growth in the district. Growth projections should be coordinated with the City of Jacksonville in accordance with the Interlocal Agreement established pursuant to Chapter 163, Florida Statutes;
      2. An inventory of existing school facilities utilizing the most recent Educational Plant Survey maintained by the Florida Department of Education;
      3. A profile of all school facilities showing physical and program characteristics, such as Head Start, magnet programs, kindergarten and pre-kindergarten, programs for LEP students, and special education classes;
      4. A summary of any proposals that would change the facility and any proposed programs to be offered at the facility or the attendance area of the facility;
      5. Reflect the needs of current and projected educational procedures and programming;
      6. Projections of facilities space needs over the five year planning period including descriptions for requested projects. (A project description describes the general location of schools to be constructed, the needs for a particular facility or for several facilities with similar requirements, and contains the project estimated budget.);
      7. Plans for the use or removal of relocatable facilities.
      8. Specify financial needs to accomplish any required construction and major maintenance, including a component to project how the required funding needs are to be met.
    2. The development of the District Educational Facilities Plan shall include participation by District-level and school-based employees. Representation shall include administrative, instructional, and non-instructional personnel.
    3. During the appropriate time frame pursuant to Florida Statute each year, the Board will hold a workshop or workshops on the Superintendent’s recommendations and on any Board-adopted alternatives. The Board will adopt a District Educational Facilities Plan pursuant to the timeframes mandated by Florida Statutes.
    4. The Superintendent will submit the draft District Educational Facilities Plan
      to the City of Jacksonville for comment prior to its adoption by the Board,
      pursuant to F.S. 1013.35.
  4. DEVELOPMENT AND ADOPTION OF FIVE YEAR LONG RANGE CAPITAL PLAN
    1. As part of the District Educational Facilities Plan, the Board will approve a Five Year Long Range Capital Plan. The first year of the adopted Five Year Long Range Capital Plan will constitute the annual capital outlay budget for the ensuing year. The plan will include:
      1. A schedule of major repair and renovation projects necessary to maintain the district’s facilities.
      2. A schedule of capital outlay projects necessary to ensure availability of satisfactory student stations based on projected enrollments.
      3. A schedule of estimated capital outlay revenues from each currently approved source which is estimated to be available for expenditures on the projects included in the Five Year Long Range Capital Plan.
      4. A schedule indicating which projects included in the Five Year Long Range Capital Plan will be funded from current estimated revenues.
    2. The information developed in the Five Year Long Range Capital Plan will be used to submit the annual Five Year District Facilities Work Program to the Florida Department of Education in accordance with Florida Statutes.
  5. REVIEW
    This policy shall be reviewed by the Board not less than every three (3) years, beginning in September 2000.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: Chapter 163, 1001.42, 1001.51, 1013.21, 1013.31, 1013.33, 1013.35, 1013.36, 1013.61, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): SEPTEMBER 18, 2017; JULY 7, 2015; NOVEMBER 10, 2008 

FORMERLY: FA, FB

Back to Top


8.51 ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY EXCELLENCE (ACE) PLANNING PROCESS
 
Background: Public participation is a vital part of planning and developing effective procedures and policy. This policy is intended to describe the Academic and Community Excellence (“ACE”) process to be used when required to implement specific School Board Policies, or when otherwise determined by the Superintendent and/or School Board to approve for implementation a specific high profile academic program or support service. The ACE process is used as the means to develop actions in support of the District’s Strategic Plan, and to ensure maximum awareness and input from the public. If another School Board Policy provides for specific details (such as timing, membership of the working groups, or otherwise), then the specific details set forth in the other School Board Policy shall control over the general procedures described in this Policy.

Implementation. The Superintendent is responsible for implementing a procedure that engages stakeholders through participation in “working groups” (as defined hereafter) assigned to review data, history, and facts related to the pending issue in order to develop scenarios for further consideration. Once the working groups complete their review, the Superintendent’s designee shall present the working groups’ findings at larger community meeting(s) for further review. After the completion of the community meeting(s), the Superintendent shall provide his/her recommendation to the School Board for approval of the pending issue. During the ACE process, the Superintendent shall report progress to the Board on a regular basis as part of the School Board’s responsibility for management oversight that ensures effective and efficient public service.

Working groups. The purpose of the working group is to engage in a focused and detailed review of all data and other factors pertaining to the pending issue, and then develop and present scenarios to be forwarded to the Superintendent’s designee(s) for presentation and review at larger community meeting(s). The composition of working groups will have broad membership in order to obtain stakeholders’ review of the pending issue, and to capture the unique geographic and demographic factors that may exist pertaining to the pending issue. Unless otherwise specified in another School Board Policy for a particular issue described therein, membership of each working group shall include at least one person representing the following: parents/guardians, students, school staff, supporting organizations, local community members, civic organizations, and business owners. Once established, the working groups will be trained in the ACE process and will meet on a regular basis in open public meetings. In addition to the public comments received during the subsequent community meeting(s) and then at School Board meetings, public comment will be received at the beginning of each working group session for a period not to exceed thirty (30) minutes (at three (3) minutes per speaker, and according to the general procedures used for Board meetings in Board Policy 2.26).

Community Engagement Process. The ACE process will support open, transparent communication with the public on the pending issues. The following are key aspects of the ACE process:  When applicable to the pending issue, the School District will be analyzed by region. Geographic planning areas will be established considering existing concurrency service areas (if any), local government jurisdictions, existing neighborhood integrity, natural boundaries such as rivers and major thoroughfares, or other criteria related to the specific issue.  When applicable to the pending issue for each program or project designated for review through the ACE process, each region (as described
above) will be represented by a local working group.  Working groups will be supported by District staff who provide data and advice as needed. Consultant assistance may be provided by the District to maximize the value of the ACE process.  Working groups will review and develop scenarios for presentation through the Superintendent’s designee for review at a larger community meeting.  All developed ACE scenarios after the working groups and community meeting(s) review will be provided to the pertinent Superintendent’s designee for consideration as possible recommendations to be submitted to the Superintendent.  The Superintendent will present final recommendation(s) to the School Board for review and discussion prior to a final decision.  In addition to the Superintendent’s reporting of progress to the School Board as noted above, the Superintendent or his/her designee will provide updates on the ACE process via the District website.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.51, 1013.35, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 1, 2010
REVISION DATE(S): JULY, 7, 2015
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.52 EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

Educational specifications shall be prepared for School Board approval to serve as the planning base for new construction, remodeling and renovation of facilities. The Superintendent or designee shall solicit input and shall prepare educational specifications.

  1. Input for educational specifications may be received from, but not limited to, the Superintendent or designee for technical data and requirements; current or prospective principals; and committees composed of supervisors, teachers and community members.
  2. Educational specifications shall be written statements that serve as a mode of communication between the District and design professional. Educational specifications shall include:
    1. The results of a process through which educational needs and objectives are identified and defined.
    2. Descriptions of the educational process and activities that will be occurring in a facility. This information shall be utilized to conceive physical spaces and to provide satisfactory and adequate accommodations.
    3. The rationale on which the design professional will base the design of the facility and form the basis for a maintenance and service program.
    4. Educational specifications and design criteria as outlined in State Requirements for Educational Facilities Chapters 3 and 6.
  3. Educational specifications will not provide spaces or requirements that exceed estimated project funds.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1013.33, 1013.36, 1013.45, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-2.0010 (SREF Chapters 3 and 6)
STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH RULE(S): 64E-16
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 

FORMERLY: FED

Back to Top


8.53 CONSOLIDATION IMPACT REVIEW PROCESS

  1. BACKGROUND
    Community engagement is an essential component of planning and implementation. This policy is intended to describe the Consolidation Impact Review Process to be used when required to implement school consolidation projects funded with proceeds from the School Board’s levy on the sales surtax as set forth in the School Board’s Resolution on March 16, 2020 and approved by voters on November 3, 2020. The consolidation projects governed by this policy include scenarios where a school boundary change is pre-defined by the district’s Master Facilities Plan as the combination of multiple existing school boundaries into a single, new school boundary. This policy shall also apply when otherwise determined by the Superintendent and/or School Board to approve implementation of a school consolidation involving multiple existing school boundaries into one, new, larger school boundary. The Consolidation Impact Review Process shall be used as the means to gather additional stakeholder input in support of the District’s consolidation plans, and to ensure maximum awareness and input from the public.
  2. IMPLEMENTATION
    The Superintendent is responsible for implementing a procedure that engages stakeholders through participation in “review groups” tasked with the review of data, history, and facts related to enrollment, location and distance between schools, existing Magnet or Choice programs, program continuity, feeder pattern data, school profiles, school programming, transportation impact and school operations. Once the review groups complete their study of the information provided, the group shall present a written report of recommendations, if any, to the Superintendent’s designee as final input for consideration by the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall provide a copy of the written report to the Board along with the rationale for including or rejecting the group’s recommendations. During the Consolidation Impact Review Process, the Superintendent shall report progress, including notifications of scheduled review group meetings, to the School Board on a regular basis as part of the School Board’s responsibility for management oversight that ensures effective and efficient public service.
  3. REVIEW GROUPS
    1. Purpose
      The primary purpose of the review process is to inform the community of the impact of the consolidation on the school and geographic communities. The review group will also engage in a focused and detailed review of all data, history, and facts related to enrollment, location and distance between schools, existing Magnet or Choice programs, program continuity, feeder pattern data, school profiles, school programming, transportation impact and school design.
      Upon review of the information provided, the review group may present a written report of recommendations, if any, to the Superintendent’s designee as final input for consideration by the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall provide a copy of the written report to the Board along with the rationale for including or rejecting the group’s recommendations.
      Recommendations may include the following:
      1. A maximum of five (5) proposed school names which shall comply with the naming or renaming requirements as set forth in Board Policy 8.59.
      2. Input regarding incidental and school operational choices as determined by the Superintendent or his/her designee.
    2. Composition of Review Groups
      The composition of review groups will have broad membership to obtain stakeholders’ review of the relevant issues, and to capture the unique geographic and demographic factors that may exist pertaining to the relevant issues. Review groups shall be identified at least twelve (12) months prior to the anticipated opening of the consolidated school. Membership of each review group shall include at least one person representing the following:
      1. Current or prospective principals
      2. Teachers
      3. Parents/guardians
      4. Students
      5. School Staff
      6. Supporting organizations
      7. Local government
      8. Local community members
      9. Civic organizations
      10. Business owners
    3. Review Group Sessions
      Once established, the review groups will meet in a minimum of three (3) open public meetings. Unless otherwise permitted by law or ordinance, the format of the open public meetings will be in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 286.011. Public comment will be received at the beginning of each review group session for a period not to exceed thirty (30) minutes, at three (3) minutes per speaker, and according to the general procedures used for Board meetings in Board Policy 2.26.
  4. COMMUNITY ENGANGEMENT AND TRANSPARENCY
    The Consolidation Impact Review Process will support open, transparent communication with the public on the issues relating to school programming and school operations. The Superintendent’s designee will implement district and school level communication strategies to ensure maximum awareness and community engagement from the public. Notifications will be timely noticed to local and school communities, including families of closed or consolidated schools.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.51, 1013.35, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 2, 2021 

Back to Top


8.54 CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATION OR REMODELINGOF FACILITIES

The Superintendent, when recommending the preliminary school budget or any amendments thereto relating to capital outlay projects, may recommend to the School Board that existing facilities be constructed, renovated, remodeled or maintained using day labor contracts pursuant to s. 1013.45, F.S. Any such day-labor contracts shall not exceed $280,000, except that beginning January 2009, this amount shall be adjusted annually based upon changes in the Consumer Price Index pursuant to s. 1013.45, F.S.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1013.01, 1013.35, 1013.45, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-2.0010
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 3, 2015; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017

FORMERLY: FJ

Back to Top


8.55 PREQUALIFICATION OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS 

All contractors for educational facilities construction shall be pre-qualified for construction contracts in accordance with State Requirements for Educational Facilities Reference No.: Chapter 4 Section 4.1(1). All construction or capital improvement bids must be accompanied by evidence that the bidder holds an appropriate certificate or license to supervise the work within the scope of the construction project.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41(1), F.S.
LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 1013.46 (2), F.S.; SREF Section 4.1 (1)
HISTORY: ADOPTED: JULY  6, 2010
REVISION DATE(S): N/A
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.56 CHANGE ORDERS

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1013.35, 1013.48, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-2.0010
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; JULY 1, 2008

REPEALED: 03/03/2015
TRANSFERRED TO: POLICY 7.70
FORMERLY: FEG

Back to Top


8.57 SUBSTANTIAL AND FINAL COMPLETION OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

  1. The School Board shall accept a construction project when the Superintendent recommends and the School Board accepts the project as substantially complete as of a date so stipulated on forms certified by the design professional, contractor, and Facilities Department.
  2. The date of substantial completion of the work or designated portion thereof is the date when the project is considered sufficiently complete so the project or designated portion thereof may be occupied for the use for which it is intended without undue inconvenience. All utility services, safety systems, applicable equipment items, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, and electrical systems shall be in place and functioning.
  3. The building project may be occupied when the project is accepted as substantially complete and the final and occupancy inspections are complete pursuant to State Board of Education Rules.
  4. The School Board shall become responsible for utility services, insurance, and maintenance of the building at the date of substantial completion. Liquidated damages provisions of the construction contract shall be calculated and established with the date of substantial completion as the project completion date.
  5. Completion of punch list items must be completed in the prescribed time as stated in the Construction Contract. If any items are not finally completed, without justifiable cause and extension of time by the School Board, within the stipulated time, the contractor shall pay to the School Board as liquidated damages for such delay, one-half of the rate indicated in the Construction Contract for liquidated damages for not completing the work.
  6. For projects less than one million dollars ($1,000,000), quarterly reports may be submitted by the Superintendent for the Board’s consideration for final acceptance of the project.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1013.50, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; JULY 2008

FORMERLY: FG

Back to Top


8.58 IMPROVEMENTS TO SCHOOL PLANTS AND GROUNDS

No building may be erected on School Board property and no school buildings or other fixed property of the School Board shall be materially altered or removed without the Superintendent's or designee's written approval. Approval will be based upon Code compliance.

  1. Any group which desires to improve the school site, to add, remodel or renovate facilities, or to purchase or install equipment requiring additional or modified utility connections, such as water, sewer, or electric, shall submit a written proposal via the Superintendent, or his/her designee, for approval.
    1. Approval shall be given only if the project is in compliance with the code and the present utility system in the School Board facility is adequate for an excessive or additional utility load.
    2. Any improvement or addition shall become the property of the School Board, unless agreed otherwise.
  2. Any change or modification in school plants or grounds by the school principal shall be submitted to the Superintendent, or his/her designee, and shall be coordinated with and have approval of the Superintendent or his/her designee. Changes or modifications include, but are not limited to, capital improvement projects, remodeling, or renovation of facilities and site improvement.
  3. No individual or organization shall be permitted to erect an honor roll, memorial, or any type of structure on the school grounds except with the Superintendent's approval. Permanent structures shall have utilitarian value in the operation of the school or shall be erected in memory of some individual or group that has been associated with the school either as a student or School Board employee or an organization which has made some outstanding contribution to the school or District school system.
  4. Articles of equipment donated to schools by individuals, groups, or organizations may be accepted if they contribute to the operation of the school program and can be used without additional cost to the District. Donors shall be notified that the title of this gift be in the name of the School Board of Duval County.
  5. All acquired, moved, or transferred property which requires alterations to buildings or grounds or to the use of facilities shall be submitted in writing to the Superintendent or designee for approval or disapproval. The request shall include a description and method of financing the change and design professional certification if required. Any agreement in which District funds are to supplement installation expenses shall require prior written approval. All installations, including air-conditioners, shall be in compliance with the overall plan for the building and its maintenance.
  6. Any hazardous facility (including, but not limited to, kilns), shall not be installed, moved, replaced, or modified without the prior review and authorization from the Superintendent, or his/her designee, and the District’s Office of Building Code Enforcement.
  7. Volunteer work is encouraged; provided, however, all participants shall sign a liability release form which is approved by legal counsel prior to initiation of such work. The school principal shall furnish such forms to the volunteers.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017

FORMERLY: FJ

Back to Top


8.59 NAMING OR RENAMING SCHOOLS

  1. While community input is desired and highly valued, the School Board has final authority over the naming, renaming, or name adjustment of any school.
  2. Requirements applicable to naming or renaming a new school (excluding a consolidated school) or existing school:
    1. The name of the school shall not be of a person (whether living or deceased);
      and
    2. The name shall not be in conflict with an existing name of a school.
  3. NAMING A NEW SCHOOL
    1. The Superintendent (or designee) shall initiate the naming of a new school. The Superintendent shall engage stakeholders and obtain community input through the established Academic and Community Excellence (ACE) process set forth in Board Policy 8.51.
    2. The Superintendent shall offer a proposed name to the School Board for its decision by a vote of the Board. The School Board may, after considering the Superintendent’s recommendation, request another name be proposed for its consideration, until the Board approves the name of the school.
  4. NAMING A CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL 
    1. The Superintendent (or designee) shall initiate the naming of a consolidated school. The Superintendent shall engage stakeholders and obtain community input through established processes governing consolidation.
    2. The Superintendent shall offer a proposed name to the School Board for its decision by a vote of the Board. The School Board may, after considering the Superintendent’s recommendation, request another name be proposed for its consideration, until the Board approves the name of the school.
  5. RENAMING AN EXISTING SCHOOL
    1. The Superintendent, any School Board member, or one of the initiating entities named below, may submit a written request to the School Board during a regular Board meeting, requesting the Board rename an existing school. An “initiating entity” is defined as:
      1. SAC of the school, evidenced by a majority vote of the membership;
      2. PTA/PTSA of the school, evidenced by a majority vote of the PTA/PTSA board;
      3. At least 75% of the school’s students;
      4. Alumni of the school (the minimum number of which is at least 75% of the school’s current student body population, as evidenced by a signed petition indicating the graduate’s name and graduation year)*; or
      5. Community members within the school’s attendance zone (the minimum number of which is at least 75% of the school’s current student body population, as evidenced by a signed petition indicating the community member’s name and address within the attendance zone)*.
        *Note: The district will have no obligation to verify the accuracy of the petitions presented.
    2. A maximum of three (3) schools at a time may be considered for renaming as set forth in this section, with the exception of schools that hold existing, similar names in primary and secondary schools.
    3. Schools that complete the renaming process under this section may not be considered for renaming for at least three (3) calendar years following the vote of the Board to accept the Superintendent’s recommendation for no name change, or the vote of the Board to reject the Superintendent’s recommendation to change the name.
    4. Upon receipt of the written request described in subsection V.A. above, the School Board shall decide by a majority vote of the Board whether to accept the written request and refer the matter to the Superintendent for further review.
    5. If the School Board accepts the written request, then within sixty (60) calendar days, the Superintendent shall establish and present to the Board all administrative procedures and protocols for renaming the school. At the time of the presentation, an accompanying written document outlining such procedures and protocols for soliciting input will be made available to the Board.
    6. The Superintendent will ensure that all administrative processes and protocols, as well as all timelines, will be available to constituents through electronic means within twelve (12) calendar days of the Board presentation referenced above.
    7. The administrative procedures and/or protocols shall include the following minimum requirements:
      1. Community Meetings - The Superintendent or designee shall host up to three (3) open community meetings. Third party facilitators or designated district administrators not assigned to a school number, should be utilized to facilitate the community meetings.
      2. Community Input - Following the conclusion of all community meetings, the Superintendent or designee shall utilize a third party to solicit input from eligible stakeholders through the use of a survey or other like instrument. Community input will be solicited from the following:
        1. SAC of the school
        2. PTA/PTSA of the school;
        3. Students of the school;
        4. Parents or Legal Guardians of students attending the school;
        5. Community members within the school’s attendance zone;
        6. Members of the school’s faculty and staff; and
        7. Alumni of the school.
      3. Each eligible stakeholder shall be limited to one submission in response to the survey or other like instrument, regardless of membership in multiple stakeholder groups as defined below.
        1. SAC of the school – active members of the School Advisory Council of the affected school at the time community input is obtained;
        2. PTA/PTSA of the school – PTA or PTSA members of the affected school at the time community input is obtained;
        3. Students of the school – current students of the school, at or above state assessed grade levels;
        4. Parents or Legal Guardians of students attending the school – parents or legal guardians of students currently enrolled at the school, regardless of the grade level of the students;
        5. Community members – current Duval County residents (at least 18 years of age) within the school’s attendance zone, and former attendance zone for dedicated magnet schools;
        6. Members of the school’s faculty and staff – part-time and full-time employees of the District who are assigned to the school’s responsibility center, including itinerant staff, and contracted staff, employed with District food service or custodial service providers;
        7. Alumni of the school – current Duval County residents who attended the school for at least one (1) day.
      4. Required identification and validation procedures and requirements for each stakeholder group;
      5. Student engagement strategies to include age-appropriate dialogue;
      6. Communication strategies for increasing public awareness of the renaming process.
    8. Within 120 calendar days of the vote of the Board to accept the renaming request, the Superintendent shall offer to the School Board for its decision (by a vote of the Board), either a proposed new name or recommend no change to the school’s existing name. In the event of extenuating circumstances that warrant additional time including, but not limited to, assessment calendars, natural disasters, or extended school breaks, the Superintendent will present the matter to the Board and offer an alternative timeline for consideration.
    9. If the Superintendent offers a proposed new name, the agenda item report shall include the following:
      1. A summary of any necessary changes as a result of the renaming to include, but not limited to, changes to signage, stationary, and team uniforms;
      2. Budget for all estimated costs; and
      3. The funding source(s), which is to be included in the “RECOMMENDATION” section of the agenda item report.
    10. The School Board may, after considering the submission of the Superintendent’s recommendation, accept or reject the recommendation, or request another name be proposed for its consideration, until the Board makes a final determination of the petition to rename the school.
  6. ADJUSTMENT TO THE NAME OF A SCHOOL
    1. The School Board shall consider requests for the Adjustment of a School Name that meets the requirements below. A request for a school name change shall be considered an Adjustment to the School Name if the following conditions are met:
      1. The main portion of the name of the school shall not be changed;
      2. The requested adjustment provides additional information about the program at the school;
      3. The requested adjustment will require only minimal changes to school signage, school colors, team mascots, team uniforms, school logos, and other impacted areas; and
      4. The school support organizations will bear the costs of the adjustment to the school name, with any district support outlined and budgeted prior to the approval of the name adjustment.
    2. The school principal will submit a request for a school name adjustment to the Superintendent, indicating the requested change. The school principal will include with the request the following documentation:
      1. Rationale for the adjustment;
      2. SAC approval for the name adjustment (including public notice of meeting), SAC membership, agenda, and minutes of the meeting where the recommendation was approved;
      3. PTA/PTSA approval for the name adjustment;
      4. Approval from members of the school’s faculty and staff through the school’s shared governance process;
      5. Student approval for the name adjustment;
      6. Listing of any necessary changes as a result of the adjustment, to include but not limited to changes to signage, stationary, and team uniforms; and
      7. Budget for all estimated costs, to include funding source(s).
    3. The Superintendent shall review the request of the school for the name adjustment and shall offer to the School Board (for its decision by a vote of the Board), either a proposed name adjustment to the Board or recommend no change to the school’s existing name. The School Board may, after considering the submission of the Superintendent’s recommendation, accept or reject the recommendation, or request another name be proposed for its consideration, until the Board makes a final determination on the petition to adjust the name of the school.
    4. Requirements applicable to adjusting the name of a school:
      1. The adjustment to the name of the school shall not include the addition of the name of a person (whether living or deceased);
      2. The adjustment to the name shall not be in conflict with an existing name of a school;
      3. The adjustment to the name may not create an undue financial hardship on the school community, either to support organizations through changes to the school’s facilities, or by the requirement of families to purchase new articles with the adjusted name (such as school uniforms, jackets, planners, and extracurricular expenditures) solely on the basis of the name adjustment; and
      4. The approval of the name adjustment is contingent upon sufficient funds being raised in order to fully implement all aspects of the name adjustment and shall be effective upon the district’s verification that all funds have been secured.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.41, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; MARCH 5, 2019; SEPTEMBER 7, 2021

FORMERLY: FF

Back to Top


8.591 NAMING OR RENAMING FACILITIES

  1. INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION
    1. This policy does not pertain to the naming or renaming of schools. Procedures for the naming or renaming or schools are set forth in Board Policy 8.59. Instead, this policy pertains to the naming or renaming of a “facility” owned by the Duval County School Board.
    2. The term “facility” as used herein shall include, but not be limited to, the following: a building, library, media center, auditorium, performing arts center, gymnasium, athletic field, stadium, or other area at a school or other real property owned by the School Board of Duval County.
  2. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
    1. A facility shall not be named after any person who is currently serving in an elected office at the time the facility is named. 
    2. A facility shall not be named after any person who is currently employed by the Duval County School Board at the time the facility is named.
    3. In the event that a facility is named after a person, that person should have made significant contributions in the field of education, to the school at which the facility is located, to the Duval County Public Schools as a whole, to the community in which the facility is located, or to the City of Jacksonville.
    4. No one person shall have more than one school district site or facility named after that person.
    5. If the facility is recommended to be named for a living person, written consent must first be obtained from the proposed person before the recommendation is submitted to the School Board for consideration. Said person shall be subject to the same background screening requirements for volunteers as set forth in School Board Policy 9.60.
    6. If the proposed name is for a location, the name shall be descriptive of the geographical area in which the facility is located.
    7. All proposed names must be reasonable in length, as determined by the Facility Naming Committee.
    8. No person shall have any property right or interest in the naming of a facility. The School Board expressly reserves the right to rename a facility at any time.
    9. Facilities named or renamed pursuant to this policy may not be considered for renaming for at least five (5) calendar years following Board action to name or rename the facility, unless the School Board, through a majority vote, determines a need for reconsideration of the name of the facility.
  3. NAME PROPOSALS
    1. Any of the initiating entities named below may submit a naming proposal to the Facility Naming Committee upon receipt of a proposal which meets the considerations set forth in section II of this policy. An "initiating entity" is defined as the Superintendent, any member of the Duval County School Board, or the Principal of the school in which the facility is located.
    2. Naming proposals and supporting documentation, including funding source and budget, should be submitted in writing and provided to the Superintendent, to any member of the Duval County School Board, or to the Principal of the school at which the facility is located, to initiate review. The Board Chair, district Board Member, Superintendent, and Principal of the school shall be notified of all naming proposals. 
  4. FACILITY NAMING COMMITTEE
    1. A Facility Naming Committee shall be established for the purpose of reviewing and considering proposals to name or rename facilities.
    2. When the Board Chair receives proposal(s) to name or rename a facility from an initiating entity defined in this policy, the Board Chair shall call a meeting of the Facility Naming Committee for the purpose of considering the proposal(s). Additional naming proposals may be submitted at the Facility Naming Committee meeting, provided the proposals meet the considerations of this policy. 
    3. The Facility Naming Committee will be comprised of the following voting members:
      1. The Board Chair (or their designee);
      2. The Board member in whose district the facility to be named is located;
      3. An additional member to be designated by the Board member in whose district the facility to be named is located;
      4. The Director of Athletics, or the appropriate departmental representative, as designated by the Superintendent;
      5. A representative from the community surrounding the school that is to be named, to be selected by the Region Superintendent in whose region the facility is located;
      6. The Principal of the school at which the facility is located;
      7. The Chairperson of the School Advisory Council of the school at which the facility is located.
    4. In the event that the Board Chair is also the Board member in whose district the facility to be named or renamed is located, the Board Vice-Chair shall serve on the Facility Naming Committee.
    5. The Facility Naming Committee shall vote to determine which single proposal, if any, is recommended to the School Board.
    6. All meetings of the Facility Naming Committee shall be subject to the Sunshine Law, including an opportunity for public comment.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: MAY 2, 2023
REVISION DATE(S): N/A

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.60 TECHNICAL PLAN

  1. The Superintendent shall develop a comprehensive Technology Plan subject to School Board approval for administrative and instructional purposes. The plan shall promote access, collaboration, information sharing and instructional integration across the district and the global community.
  2. The Superintendent shall be responsible for establishing and providing telecommunications services, instructional technology services, information management services, computer services and data networks aligned with the Technology Plan.
  3. The Superintendent or designee shall develop guidelines relating to access and use of such digital tools and networks throughout the district to ensure the safety and security of district employees, students and resources.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED 1001.43, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 64-E16
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 10, 2008
REVISION DATE(S): N/A
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.70 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

  1. The District shall develop and maintain an integrated information system for educational management. The Superintendent/designee shall ensure that compatibility exists with the state comprehensive management information system. Procedures and guidelines shall be developed to ensure that adequate management information support needs are met.
  2. The Superintendent shall provide for an ongoing electronic data processing system in support of the School Board management and decision-making processes.
    1. All projects designed and implemented shall be in compliance with and responsive to Florida Statutes, State Board of Education rules, and SchoolBoard rules.
    2. Procedures related to remote access, audit vulnerability scans, e-mail retention, information sensitivity, risk assessment, disposal and destruction of non-print media materials and software, and virtual private network connections shall also be developed. Additional procedures shall be developed as technology changes and such procedures are required.
  3. In compliance with Florida Statutes, a committee for Reports and Forms Management shall be established. The Superintendent shall develop administrative procedures concerning the makeup, selection, functions and authority of the committee.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.11, 1008.385, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017

FORMERLY: EH, EHA

Back to Top


8.71 ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY (AUP)

  1. PURPOSE/SCOPE
    1. The School District of Duval County, Florida (District) adheres to the belief that technology should play a vital role in meeting the needs of the broad range of abilities, disabilities, cultural backgrounds and ethnic populations represented in district schools. Individuals using information resources belonging to the District must act in a legal, ethical, responsible, and secure manner, with respect for the rights of others.
    2. The primary purpose of the District network is to assist in preparing students for success in life and work in the 21st century. Computer and/or electronic networks provide the ability to share educational and research resources from around the world. These resources include, but are not limited to, access to instructional/business applications, interactive collaboration between teachers, students and other users, document sharing, and communications of all forms with people from around the world.
    3. The District provides employees and students with access to the District’s electronic communication system (Wide Area Network), which includes Internet (email) and telephone access, and any future electronic digital communication devices (“District System”).
    4. Access to computers, computing systems and networks owned by the District is a privilege which imposes certain responsibilities and obligations, and is subject to District policies and procedures, Code of Student Conduct, the Code of Ethics of the Education Profession in the State of Florida, and governing laws. These procedures set forth the principles that govern appropriate use of information resources, and are intended to promote the efficient, ethical and lawful use of these resources.
    5. To ensure that technology shall play a predominant role, this policy provides guidance for appropriate technology utilization and integration into the curriculum, as well as infusion into school/district administration and management.
  2. GENERAL STATEMENT OF POLICY.
    1. In making decisions regarding employee and student access to the school district computer system and to the Internet, the school district considers its own stated educational mission, goals, and objectives.
    2. Access to the school district digital network and to the Internet enables the exploration of thousands of libraries, databases, bulletin boards, and other resources while exchanging messages with people around the world.
    3. The school district expects that faculty will blend thoughtful use of the school district network and the Internet throughout the curriculum and will provide guidance and instruction to students in their use.
    4. The proper use of the Internet, and the educational value gained from proper Internet use is the joint responsibility of students, parents, and employees of the school district.
  3. USE OF SYSTEM IS A PRIVILEGE. The use of the school district system and access to use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right. If there are violations of this privilege, depending on the nature and degree of the violation and the number of previous violations, unacceptable use of the school district system or the Internet may result in one or more of the following consequences:
    1. Suspension or cancellation of use of access privileges;
    2. Payments for damages and repairs;
    3. Discipline under appropriate school district policies, including suspension, expulsion, exclusion or termination of employment; or
    4. Civil or criminal liability under other applicable laws.
  4. PERSONAL USE. Employees are permitted to utilize the District System for non-work related activities provided that such limited use does not conflict or interfere with official use of the District System or the employee’s duties and responsibilities.
  5. INFORMATION SECURITY AWARENESS. Employees are required to complete Information Security Awareness training at least once. This training can be completed at the Florida Department of Education website.
  6. PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES
    1. Users are ultimately responsible for the activity that occurs under their account and their assigned equipment, or using another person’s computer account, with or without his or her permission, including:
      1. Revealing account passwords to others or allowing the use of one’s account or District equipment by others, including family, friends, and other household members.
      2. Revealing system passwords (e.g., District system passwords, database passwords, etc.) to anyone who is not specifically authorized to use them.
      3. Knowingly allowing a student to access their assigned laptop or administrative desktop. Students are only permitted to access student designated computers and should never access or log on to a teacher or administrative computer.
    2. Making unauthorized changes to District computer resources, including installation of unapproved software or interfering with security measures (such as audit trail logs and anti-virus software).
    3. Unauthorized security scanning, network monitoring, or data interception that is not part of the employee’s regular job duties and approved by the Information Security Manager.
    4. Implementing any computer systems or adding unapproved components or devices to the District’s equipment without approval from the Technology department.
    5. Using the District’s equipment or personal equipment while on District property to connect to any wireless network not provided by the District without authorization from the Information Security Manager is prohibited.
    6. Circumventing any District information security measures or causing security breaches or disruptions of network communication.
    7. Knowingly introducing malicious programs into the network or server (e.g., viruses, worms, Trojan horses, e-mail bombs, etc.)
    8. Unauthorized access to other computer systems using District information resources.
    9. Using School Board computing resources for personal or private financial gain.
    10. Transmitting, storing, or processing classified data except as authorized and in accordance with the Duval County Public Schools Data Classification Guidelines.
    11. Performing functions that are not related to the employee’s job responsibilities on systems that they are otherwise authorized to access which could lead to:
      1. Intentionally corrupting,
      2. Misusing, or
      3. Stealing software or any other computing resource.
    12. Accessing District systems that are not necessary for the performance of the employee’s duties, including student and employee records.
    13. Copying District proprietary software or business data for personal or other non-School Board use.
    14. Unauthorized copying of copyrighted material including, but not limited to, digitization and distribution of photographs from magazines, books, or other copyrighted sources, copyrighted music, and the installation of any copyrighted software for which District or the end user does not have an active license.
    15. Disseminating trade secrets or business confidential information, except as permitted by law or regulation.
    16. Exporting software, technical information, encryption software, or technology, in violation of international or regional export control laws.
    17. Use of encryption software or hardware that has not been authorized by the Information Security Manager.
    18. Sending unsolicited e-mail messages (spam).
    19. Any form of harassment via electronic methods.
    20. Creating of forwarding “chain-letters”, “Ponzi” or other “pyramid” schemes of any type.
    21. Posting agency information to external public forums without authority or conducting any activity that could create the perception that communication was made in one’s official capacity as a School Board employee, unless appropriate approval was obtained.
    22. Any personal use that could cause congestion, delay, or disruption of service to any School Board system or equipment.
    23. The use of software to conduct any of the following:
      1. Accessing information resources, data, equipment, or facilities in violation of any restriction on this document.
      2. Knowingly, without written authorization, executing a program that may hamper normal District computing activities.
      3. Interfering with or denying service to other information resource users.
    24. Using School Board office equipment, systems or information resources for activities that are political, illegal, inappropriate, or offensive to fellow employees or the public. This includes, but is not limited to, materials related to:
      1. Sexually explicit or sexually oriented content
      2. Offensive comments related to race, color, religion, gender or gender identity/expression, age, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, political or religious beliefs, national or ethnic origin, pregnancy,
        veteran status, or any other distinguishing physical or personality characteristics
      3. Anything that is in violation of sexual harassment or hostile workplace laws
      4. Making fraudulent offers of products, items, or services
      5. Gambling
      6. Illegal weapons or terrorist activities
      7. Planning or commission of any crime
      8. Forging or misrepresenting one’s identity
      9. Engaging in any unauthorized fund-raising activity
      10. Participating in any lobbying activity
      11. Engaging in any political activity in violation of District Board Policy 6.85
  7. INTERNET SAFETY POLICY FOR STUDENT INTERNET USE. Employing the following technology protection measures, the District provides safe internet use for students utilizing district owned or provided devices, or any device (including privately owned) connected to district or school-provided internet by:
    1. Filtering and/or blocking access to material that is not appropriate for students, taking into consideration the subject matter and the age of the students served at each school;
    2. Protecting the safety and security of students when using email, chat rooms, and other forms of direct electronic communications.
    3. Preventing the hacking or unauthorized access by students to data or information that they should not have access to, and to prohibit other unlawful online activities by students;
    4. Preventing access to websites, web or mobile applications, or software that do not protect against the disclosure, use, or dissemination of students’ personal information in accordance with Rule 6A-1.0955, F.A.C.;
    5. Prohibiting students from accessing social media platforms, except when expressly directed by a teacher for an educational purpose.
    6. Prohibiting the use of TikTok, Snapchat and any successor platforms, on all district- or school-owned devices, or on any device (including privately owned) connected to district- or school-provided internet. The District
      currently blocks popular social media platforms such as Facebook; Twitter; Instagram, Pinterest for all
      students, and TikTok and Snapchat for all users.
    7. Prohibiting the use of TikTok, Snapchat or any successor platforms, to be used to communicate or promote any school district, school, school- sponsored club, extracurricular organization, or athletic team.
  8. ONLINE CONTENT FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. Employees must provide safe internet use for students by: 
    1. Prior to requiring students to use online content, staff must confirm the content is not blocked by the student internet filter.
    2. Staff may request that blocked content or social media platforms be reviewed and unblocked for educational purposes by contacting the Information Technology service desk or submitting a self-initiated service ticket.
  9. ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS. Employees must utilize applications approved by the District’s Information Technology Department for all communication with students, parents, and guardians.
  10. LIMITED EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY. The District owns and operates all hardware, software, and data on the digital network. The District will cooperate fully with local, state, and federal authorities in any investigation concerning or related to any illegal activities and activities not in compliance with school district policies conducted through the District’s digital network. District employees should be aware that data and other materials in files maintained on the District’s digital network might be subject to review, disclosure or discovery under Florida Statutes, including Chapter 119, Florida Statutes.
    1. Routine maintenance and monitoring of the District system may lead to a discovery that a user has violated this policy, another District policy, or the law.
    2. An individual investigation or search will be conducted if school authorities have a reasonable suspicion that the search will uncover a violation of law or District policy.
  11. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
    1. The District makes no guarantee that the functions or services provided by or through the District system will be error-free or without defect.
    2. The District is not responsible for any damage the user may suffer, including but not limited to, loss of data or interruptions of service.
    3. The District is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of the information obtained through or stored on the system.
    4. The District will not be responsible for financial obligations resulting from the unauthorized use of the system.
  12. VANDALISM/HARASSMENT
    1. Vandalism and/or harassment may result in the cancellation of the offending user’s account.
    2. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data of another user, the Internet or other networks. This includes, but is not limited to, deliberate attempts to degrade or disrupt equipment, software or system performance or by creating or spreading viruses.
    3. Harassment is defined as the persistent annoyance of another user or the interference in another user’s work. This includes, but is not limited to, the sending of unwanted mail.
  13. PENALTIES. Any user violating these provisions, applicable state and federal laws, or posted classroom and District rules is subject to loss of network privileges and any other District disciplinary options, including referral to law enforcement for possible criminal prosecution.
  14. Pursuant to Rule 6A-1.0957, F.A.C., this policy must be reviewed and approved annually by the School Board.
  15. ACCEPTABLE USE AGREEMENT

All terms and conditions as stated in the ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY for the DIGITAL NETWORK of the DUVAL COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT are applicable to all users of the network. These provisions reflect an agreement of the parties and shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Florida and the United States of America. By signing (or electronically accepting) this form, agreement is made to the terms in the Duval County Public Schools Acceptable Use Policy. In accordance with the Electronic and Communications Privacy Act of 1986, (18 US Section 2510), users are hereby notified that there are no facilities provided by Duval County Public Schools for sending or receiving private or confidential electronic communications. All messages will be determined to be readily accessible to the public. Duval County Public Schools shall be held harmless against any claims arising from said use.


I understand and will abide by the ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY for the DIGITAL NETWORK of the Duval County School District. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges may be revoked; district disciplinary action and/or appropriate legal action may be taken. I hereby release the Duval County Public Schools (DCPS), its personnel and any institutions with which it is affiliated, from any and all claims and damages of any nature arising from my use of, or inability to use, the district’s networks and computer systems, including, but not limited to what is
contained in this document.


I understand that this ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY must be reviewed and acknowledged on an annual basis on the anniversary of my Hire Date.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: CHAPTERS 119, 163, 282, 381, 815, 817, 839, 847, 934, F.S. 15 USC 1, 6801-6809 (GLBA),
15 USC 6501-6506 (COPPA), 18 US 2520 35 USC 44 (FISMA), P.L. 104-191 (HIPAA), 47 CFR 54.520 (CIPA), 20 USC S. 1232G (FERPA)

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.0957, F.A.C.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): SEPTEMBER 7, 2010; JULY 12, 2021; NOVEMBER 7, 2023

Back to Top


8.72 DATA SYSTEMS SECURITY

  1. This policy establishes responsibilities and operating procedures for ensuring an adequate level of information security for all information collected, created, processed, transmitted, stored or disseminated on DCPS information systems. All DCPS employees, students, contract employees, vendors, and others who do official business with DCPS are expected to comply with the provisions of this policy. For purposes of this policy and related policies, the terms “data” and “information” are used interchangeably.
  2. DEFINITION OF TERMS
    1. Division Head: Directs operations within a division by performing duties personally or through subordinate supervisors.
    2. Employee: Individuals employed by DCPS in established instructional, administrative, non-certificated, and instructional support positions as defined in accordance with the provision of Florida Statutes. For purposes of this policy, employees also include personal services contractors, industrial contractors, consultants, and experts hired on contract.
    3. Information/Data Custodian: The DCPS Information Management Department, which is the organizational unit that implements data policies, procedures, regulations and guidelines; oversees the safe transport and storage of enterprise data; and has responsibility for IT systems that create, receive, store, process and/or transmit institutional data. The Custodians focus on the underlying infrastructure and activities required to keep enterprise data intact and available to users.
    4. Information/Data Steward: A DCPS employee, appointed by the appropriate executive level organizational representative, who acts as the conduit between Information Technology (IT) and data users. Stewards accept accountability for data access based upon assigned user roles and authorizations; data classification for data housed in their areas of responsibility; and information quality levels for specific data subject areas.
    5. Information Resources: Equipment, facilities, software and data that are designed, built, operated and maintained to collect, record, process, store, retrieve, display and transmit information.
    6. Information Security Manager (ISM): Individual responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining a DSSP for DCPS. Directly reports to the Chief Technology Officer.
    7. Information Security Training and Awareness Program: A program to maintain effective awareness of information security policy, standards and acceptable practices.
    8. Data Systems Security Program (DSSP): The multiple components which comprise the ‘program’ aimed at protecting the confidentiality, integrity and availability of DCPS information systems resources.
    9. Information/Data Users: Individuals who use or have access to DCPS’s information resources, including employees, vendors, and visitors.
    10. Risk Management: The process of identifying, assessing, and taking steps to reduce risk to an acceptable level. The risk management process allows DCPS to balance the operational and economic costs of protective measures and achieve gains in mission capability by protecting the IT systems and data that support the District’s mission.
    11. Security Incident: Any activity that is a threat to the availability, integrity, or confidentiality of DCPS’s information resources, or any action that is in violation of this policy.
    12. Security Operations Center (SOC): A separate isolated organization that is responsible for the Information Security functions within the District. Directly reports to the Information Security Manager.
    13. Supervisors: DCPS employees who have formal supervisory responsibility for employees, contractors, or other information users. This includes managers, and other supervisory personnel.
  3. PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES
    1. A strong security position shall be maintained through the application of security controls, data ownership responsibilities, and maintenance of the security infrastructure. This policy articulates requirements that assist
      management in defining a framework that establishes a secure environment. This framework provides the overarching structure for safeguarding Information Technology (IT) Resources, achieving confidentiality, integrity and availability of the data and IT Resources used to manage the services provided by outside agencies, authorities, and business partners.
    2. DCPS Division Heads are responsible for having controls in effect to assure that security objectives are adequately addressed. Divisions must comply with the overall information security goals of the Policy including compliance with laws, regulations, policies and standards to which their technology resources and data, including but not limited to personal information, are subject.
      1. The Information Security Manager (ISM) shall educate DCPS employees (and when necessary, individuals doing official business with DCPS) about information security, and the protocols and procedures with which they must comply, by implementing an Information Security Training and Awareness Program. The program will include both periodic training classes as well as an ongoing security awareness campaign designed to maintain vigilance toward information security. New employees will receive information security training as part of the orientation process. All employees will receive mandatory training on at least an annual basis. Information Owners will provide training to information users regarding the security policies and procedures for their specific systems.
      2. Risk Management shall be integrated into DCPS’s decision-making and systems development life cycle.
      3. An annual review will be conducted by the ISM to determine any necessary changes to any portions of the DSSP policy. All changes will be routed for approval following the Districts policy approval process.
  4. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
    1. All DCPS Information Users share the responsibility of protecting the district’s information resources and adhering to the Districts policy regarding their usage.
    2. The Executive Director, Information Management (Executive Director) shall monitor, evaluate, and report the status of information security within the District to Executive Management. The Executive Director will ensure that the DSSP aligns with DCPS’ business objectives, and that information technology decisionmaking includes an analysis of the risks involved. Other responsibilities of the Executive Director include managing
      development and operation of the DSSP, and ensuring the integration of the program with Disaster Recovery initiatives, procedures, and strategic plans. The Executive Director also acts as liaison with Executive Management regarding approval and status of DCPS Information Security Policies and Practices.
    3. The Information Security Manager (ISM) shall develop, implement, and maintain an effective DSSP for DCPS.
      In addition, the ISM shall:
      1. Assess risks, develop policies and procedures, provide security guidance, conduct compliance reviews, and ensure the investigation of information security incidents.
      2. Create, implement, and test the District’s Disaster Recovery Plan.
      3. Conduct computer, network, internet, and mobile device forensic investigations at the direction of the Chief Human Resources Officer and Chief of Police.
      4. Establish working groups regarding security matters as required to manage the Districts Security Awareness Program.
      5. Ensure employees, contractors, and any other individual granted access to information systems sign an appropriate individual confidentiality agreement.
      6. Manage daily operation of the SOC to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, security, and availability of DCPS information resources.
      7. Ensure that all IT systems and applications developed by or for use within the DCPS Network conform to this and other applicable DCPS Policies, Procedures and Standard Operating Procedures. Nonconforming IT systems cannot be deployed unless the purchasing entity and their contractor have jointly applied for and received notice, in writing, from the Executive Director of Information Management, and the Information Security Manager (ISM), that a specified deviation will be permitted.
    4. The Security Operations Center (SOC) shall manage and control:
      1. External access to the district’s network and IT resources
      2. District’s firewalls
      3. The Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems (IDS/IPS)
      4. Web content filtering to include monitoring and reporting
      5. Security event log management
      6. IT related public records requests
      7. Auditing of District’s policy
      8. ERP auditing / reporting
      9. Vulnerability risk assessment and security related patching
      10. Assisting internal/external agencies with digital forensic investigations
    5. Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that their employees understand their information security responsibilities and for taking strong disciplinary actions related to employee violations of DSSP policies, procedures, and guidelines.
  5. ENFORCEMENT
    Violation of this policy may result in loss or limitations on use of information resources as well as disciplinary and/or legal action, including termination of employment or referral for criminal prosecution.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: Chapters 163, 282, 381, 443, 655, 815, 817839, 847, 934, F.S. 15 USC 1, 6801- (GLBA), 15 USC 6501 (COPPA), 35 USC 44 (FISMA),
P.L. 104-191 (HIPAA), P.L. 106- 554 (CIPA), 20 USC S. 1232g (FERPA)
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
REVISION DATE(S): DECEMBER 9, 2013 
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.73 ENTERPRISE DATA MANAGEMENT

  1. This policy applies to all official and/or authoritative data that are critical to the administration of the enterprise (referred to herein as the Duval County Public School District, DCPS, or the District). Although these data may reside in different DCPS systems of record they are, in the aggregate, considered District enterprise data. Enterprise data include, but are not limited to, shared (or potentially shared across organizational units) data about District facilities, students, payroll, finance, employees, resources, vendors, etc. They are data that are relevant to
    the operation, plans, or management of more than one District organizational unit or are reported on or used in official District administrative reports.
  2. The purpose of this policy is to ensure the value and guarantee the effective use of District data and information in accordance with applicable laws, policies and mandates (e.g. federal and state laws and administrative rules, Florida Department of Education data definition and reporting requirements, and DCPS Board policies and procedures). This policy defines terms related to enterprise data management and the various roles and responsibilities of DCPS employees and stakeholders relative to DCPS enterprise data.
  3. DEFINITION OF TERMS
    1. Data Management: The management, control, and protection of data as a DCPS asset including the facilitation of processes to provide District users with timely access to the data that they need.
    2. Data Stewardship: Data stewardship encompasses the responsibilities and accountabilities associated with managing, collecting, viewing, storing, sharing, disclosing, or otherwise making use of DCPS data. The principles of data stewardship apply to all of the personnel, systems, and processes engaging in DCPS information storage and exchange within and across organizational units
    3. Information/Data Custodian: The DCPS Information Management Department, which is the organizational unit that implements data policies, procedures, regulations and guidelines; oversees the safe transport and
      storage of enterprise data; and has responsibility for IT systems that create, receive, store, process and/or transmit institutional data. The Data Custodians focus on the underlying infrastructure and activities required to keep enterprise data intact and available to users.
    4. Information/Data Steward: A DCPS employee, appointed by the appropriate executive level organizational representative, who acts as the conduit between Information Technology (IT) and data users. Data stewards accept accountability for data access based upon assigned user roles and authorizations; data classification for data housed in their areas of responsibility; and information quality levels for specific data subject
      areas
    5. Information/Data Users: Individuals who use or have access to DCPS’s information resources, including employees, vendors, and visitors.
    6. Metadata: Data that describe other data and, in doing so, give context to the source data.
  4. District data and the metadata about those data are business and technical resources owned by Duval County Public Schools. District data are the property of DCPS and are not owned by any individual or organizational unit. It is essential that all employees recognize that the proper management of strategic enterprise data is critical to the success of the organization.
  5. The value of District data is increased through its widespread and appropriate use; its value is diminished through misuse, misinterpretation, or unnecessary restriction to its access.
  6. DCPS uses a role-based security system for user authorization and access to District data. This ensures that users have access to information that is appropriate to their District roles and responsibilities. Data users will be granted
    secure access, at the approved level, to view or query all District data necessary for the individual or organizational unit to perform all legitimate official responsibilities pertaining to the District. Examples include, but are not limited to, planning, decision making, official reporting, etc. Access to District data is subject to District rules, regulations, policies and all relevant state and federal laws.
  7. SECURITY AND INTEGRITY OF DISTRICT DATA
    1. Data Users that access District data are responsible for the integrity, validity and correctness of the data that are in their possession and must incorporate editing and validation checks to ensure the integrity and validity of such data.
    2. When Data Users identify errors in District data, they must work with Data Custodians to correct the data.
    3. If information that is derived from District data cannot be reconciled with official District data, it cannot be considered official District data or presented as such.
  8. RELEASE/TRANSFER OF DISTRICT DATA BETWEEN DISTRICT AND THIRD PARTIES
    1. The purchase of software that requires the transfer of data between the district and the vendor must include documentation that the vendor:
      1. Meets the Information Management Technical Requirements for Internally/Externally Hosted Applications
      2. Has signed a District Non-Disclosure Agreement
      3. Has completed a District Data Request Form
    2. DCPS individuals and/or departments that authorize the release of data in their care to authorized internal and/or external parties must follow established District procedures for implementing and documenting this
      process. Requests for the release of data must be made through the designated DCPS request system. Documentation must include a signed disclosure agreement that lists the data disclosed and advises receiving parties of their legal and ethical responsibilities related to possession of the data.
    3. In order to preserve the integrity and validity of District data, the transfer of data from a source outside DCPS must be made from the originating source directly to the relevant DCPS system of record.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 119.01, 119.041, 257.37, 1001.43, 1001.52, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.0014

HISTORY ADOPTED: DECEMBER 9, 2013 
REVISION DATES: N/A

Back to Top


8.74 DISTRICT CONTROL OF DATA PROCESSING RESOURCES

  1. COMPUTER DATABASE RESOURCES
    1. The Superintendent shall development procedures to ensure protection of the District's investment in application software and data files. The system shall include provisions for storing backup or duplicate. Procedures and operating practices associated with access to the District's data bases shall conform with the confidentiality of the data involved.
    2. All computer-printed reports, documents, tapes, and other outputs shall remain the sole property of the School Board. School Board employees shall not use these properties for personal reasons or for profit and shall not allow unauthorized personnel to use such properties for private use or gain.
  2. DATA PROCESSING SOFTWARE
    1. The School Board shall hold copyrights for all data processing software which is created by School Board employees performing their job responsibilities and by individuals, companies, or agencies under contract
      with the School Board to develop software for District use. The Superintendent shall be responsible for obtaining copyrights for all data processing software created by the District.
    2. The Superintendent shall establish and the School Board shall approve all fees for any public or private entity to purchase or obtain a license for data processing software copyrighted by the District. Provided, however, fees be pursuant to Section 119.07(1), Florida Statutes, for an individual or entity that needs the District's copyrighted data processing software solely for application to data or for information maintained or generated by the software.
  3. SALE OF COMPUTER SERVICES
    All computer-printed reports, documents, labels, magnetically recorded media, tapes, electronically transmitted information, and other outputs which are supplied to private agencies, including those providing fringe benefits coverage, shall be provided under the provisions of Florida Statutes and applicable federal law. Fees and charges for computer services shall be established to recover all direct and indirect costs. Funds generated through computer service fees shall be recorded and disbursed as part of the normal operating funds for data processing services.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: Chapter 119, 1001.41, 1001.42, 1001.51, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008; SEPTEMBER 18, 2017

FORMERLY: DFE, EHAA

Back to Top


8.75 ASSIGNMENT OF PORTABLE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

  1. Laptop computers, tablets, cellular telephones and other devices may be assigned to employees for conducting School Board business. A record of equipment and the employee to whom it was assigned shall be maintained.
  2. Any employee who is assigned portable equipment shall be responsible for the equipment. Equipment must be returned if a person terminates employment or transfers to a different position and no longer meets the criteria for issuance of electronic equipment. Any employee who fails to return the assigned portable equipment may be subject to withholding of applicable leave payments to the extent permitted by law and applicable collective bargaining agreements.
  3. Any employee who is assigned portable equipment shall use the equipment to fulfill the responsibilities of his/her position and shall adhere to the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP), federal and state laws, School Board policies and professional standards. Misuse of such equipment may result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.
  4. The Superintendent or designee shall establish procedures for the assignment, use, inventory, maintenance, and return of portable electronic equipment.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, 1012.23, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1012.23, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 10, 2008
REVISION DATE(S): SEPTEMBER 18, 2017; MARCH 1, 2022

Back to Top


8.80 RECORDS RETENTION AND DISPOSAL

  1. The School Board shall establish and maintain a system for the retention and destruction of District school records in order to reduce the space required for record storage and to permit the Superintendent to administer the affairs of the District more efficiently.
  2. Pursuant to public records laws and rules of the Florida Department of State, the management information services office shall develop a records retention schedule for each records series or type of record, including teachers’ records on each student’s grade and attendance.
  3. Records which are designated as permanent in Florida Statutes, and by the Division of Archives, History and Records Management of the Florida Department of State, and those selected by the School Board or Superintendent as having permanent value may be destroyed after being photographed or reproduced on film or stored on electronic media, provided applicable audits have been completed for the period covering the dates of
    said documents. Photographs or microphotographs, in the form of film or prints made in compliance with this rule, shall have the same force and effect as the originals and shall be treated as originals for the purpose of admissibility in evidence.
  4. After complying with the provisions of Florida Statutes, the Superintendent is authorized, at his/her discretion, to destroy general correspondence over three (3) years old and other records, papers, and documents over three (3)
    years old which are on the retention schedule approved by the Division of Archives, provided such records do not serve as an agreement or understanding or have value as permanent records. However, commodity records are to be maintained five (5) years.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 119.01, 119.041, 257.37, 1001.43, 1001.52, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
FORMERLY: EHB

Back to Top


8.90 COURIER AND DELIVERY SERVICES

District courier mail service system shall be maintained to deliver in-district communications to the intended recipient in the most practicable way.

  1. The use of District mail facilities and personnel for the distribution of materials and communications shall be restricted to those materials and communications which are in direct support of the District's operations.
  2. Outside agencies shall be prohibited from using the courier system; provided, however, the Superintendent or designee may permit an outside agency to use the courier system if:
    1. the material is determined to be beneficial to students or School Board employees;
    2. the organization requesting use is a governmental agency or a not-forprofit organization recognized by the District as being in an official support relationship with the District; and
    3. distribution does not violate federal or state law.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.43, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
FORMERLY: EGAE

Back to Top


8.92 WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION

  1. A central supplies warehouse system shall be utilized for the distribution of supplies used in instruction, administration, custodial care, and food services and for maintenance repair parts and supplies.
  2. Selected supplies shall be distributed to requesting School Board facilities on a cyclical basis. Equipment and supplies which cannot be centrally received on an effective basis shall be bid for delivery by the respective vendors to the requisitioning units.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.42, 1001.43, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: APRIL 1, 1997
REVISION DATE(S): NOVEMBER 10, 2008 
FORMERLY: EDA

Back to Top


8.95 CONSERVATION OF RESOURCES

The School Board of Duval County is committed to the conservation of resources, both natural and material. Resources shall include, but not be limited to, electricity, water, fuel oil, gasoline, natural gas, propane, and refuse. All conservation initiatives shall be consistent with Florida Statutes and State Requirements for Educational Facilities.

  1. RESOURCE CONSERVATION PROGRAM
    The Superintendent or designee shall develop a comprehensive resource conservation program which shall include short and long range plans to conserve resources, procedures to be observed by all staff members, an instructional program to be implemented at all grade levels, and a method of evaluating the conservation program.
  2. CURRICULUM
    Resource conservation shall be incorporated into the curriculum at all grade levels and appropriate subject areas. The curriculum shall address the economic, environmental, and social impact of resource conservation.
  3. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
    1. New facilities shall be designed and constructed to be energy and water efficient. Renovations and additions to existing facilities shall include features to minimize energy and water consumption. Facilities
      shall be operated in a manner to minimize energy and water use.
    2. Life-cycle costs shall be determined prior to construction or renovation of buildings or replacement of major equipment.
    3. Equipment to reduce energy and water consumption and/or costs shall be utilized where economically feasible.
  4. RECYCLING PROGRAM
    The District shall engage in a recycling program that shall include as many reusable materials as is practical and economically feasible.
  5. INCENTIVES
    1. The District shall pursue incentive programs offered by utility companies and other energy and water providers.
    2. Cost savings shall be used to further resource conservation at school sites.
    3. An incentive program may be developed to reward schools for resource conservation initiatives.
  6. STAFF TRAINING
    Training shall be provided for school and District staff. Training shall include methods of resource conservation at the worksite, curriculum components and instructional strategies.
  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF PROGRAM
    Prior and current consumption of energy and other resources shall be determined and used as a baseline for the assessment of curriculum, procedures, equipment, maintenance strategies and facilities design that are implemented in the resource conservation program. The effectiveness of the program shall be evaluated and
    modifications shall be made based on the analysis of cost savings and utilization of resources.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 1001.43, 1013.23, 1013.44, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-25
HISTORY: ADOPTED: NOVEMBER 10, 2008
REVISION DATE(S): JULY 2, 2019 
FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.96 CRITICAL INCIDENT PREPAREDNESS

  1. The Duval County School Board (the District) recognizes that the prevention of and preparation for emergency situations is an essential priority to maximize the safety and security of all students, staff, and visitors at all District schools, administrative sites, athletic venues, and other District property. As such, the District believes reasonable life-safety efforts are the responsibility of all part-time, full-time, temporary, and contracted personnel. The District has adopted and shall continue to adopt and implement, as appropriate, a variety of safety and security measures to enhance the ability of the organization and its personnel to protect and preserve the safety of human life and property. These measures, including procedures and training requirements, are found in the District’s Emergency Procedures Manual (DEPM). Pursuant to Florida law, the DEPM is confidential and exempt from public record.
  2. The following requirements are established:
    1. All staff shall exercise reasonable care to comply with all required life-safety, policies, procedures, trainings, exercises, and drill requirements for workplace safety, supervision of students, prevention and preparedness for accidents, medical emergencies, fires, natural disasters, and acts of violence, including active assailant incidents.
    2. Building administrator(s) and/or their designee(s) shall ensure that all staff attend all mandatory emergency drill training(s) and formally document their completion of the training in or through the designated process.
    3. Building administrator(s) and/or their designee(s) of every school and administrative site shall collaborate with the District’s Police Department to schedule and conduct emergency drills with the frequency required by statute, District policies, and procedures.
    4. All staff is required to participate in emergency drill training(s) each year to familiarize themselves with the various emergency trainings, and more importantly, to know how to properly prepare and respond in each emergency situation.
    5. Building administrator(s) and/or their designee(s) of every school and administrative site shall, pursuant to the DEPM, document the completion of all actual lockdowns and emergency code trainings, to include lessons learned and areas for improvement to be implemented at the site or recommended for consideration across the district.
    6. All staff members shall take appropriate action(s), including initiating a Lockdown, on a school campus should they see, hear, or smell anything that may immediately impact the safety and security of any staff, students, or visitors on campus. Should a staff member reasonably initiate a Lockdown that does not materialize into an actual threat, there will not be an adverse employment action.
    7. All District employees and volunteers are required to promptly report any expressed threat(s) or behavior(s) that may represent a threat to the community, school, or any individual.
    8. The District’s School Safety Specialist must coordinate with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office to determine what law enforcement officers are responsible for responding to each school in the District in the event of an active assailant emergency and must provide those officers a minimum of 24 hours notice prior to conducting an active assailant emergency drill, pursuant to Section 1006.07(4)(a), F.S. These law enforcement officers must be physically present on each school campus and directly involved in the execution of active assailant emergency drills, unless their presence is determined to be unnecessary by the sheriff.
  3. EMERGENCY AND FIRE DRILLS
    1. The district shall develop policies and procedures for emergency drills and fire drills in consultation with the appropriate public safety agencies to include, at a minimum, law enforcement, fire service, and emergency management.
    2. The procedures for emergency and fire drills shall be located in the District’s Emergency Procedures Manual (DEPM). 
  4. AFTER-ACTION REPORTS. An after-action report must be completed following each emergency drill and fire drill. After-action reports must identify the type of drill, location and date of the drill, participants, and involvement of law enforcement or other public safety agencies. In addition, the after-action report must describe actions taken by participants, must analyze areas of success and areas where improvement is needed, and include input from public safety agencies and a plan for corrective action. After-action reports must be submitted to the district School Safety Specialist for review fifteen (15) calendar days following drill completion. 
  5. REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL EMERGENCY DRILLS AND FIRE DRILLS
    1. All occupants of a building or any other location where an emergency or fire drill is held must participate in the drill. 
    2. During emergency drills, fire drills and during actual emergencies, schools must use plain language to communicate the nature of the emergency and instructions to students and staff. Plain language means communication that can be understood by the intended audience, which is free of coded language, jargon, and acronyms, and meets the purpose of the communicator. 
    3. Districts must vary the conditions of emergency drills and fire drills. Drills must be held at both expected and unexpected times and under varying conditions that require school staff, students and building occupants to take protective actions based on the specific circumstances of the simulated incident. 
    4. Districts must vary the time of day in which emergency drills and fire drills are held. In setting the drill schedule, districts must consider drills beginning at nonstandard times, such as within an hour of the start of the school day, during lunch, when students are between classes, or within an hour of the end of the school day. 
    5. Emergency drills and fire drills must test all applicable functions included in the threat scenario, such as panic buttons, participant movement (lockdown, shelter-in-place, or evacuation), simulated communications with first responders, notification to parents, and appropriate protective actions, such as turning off lights, and covering windows. 
    6. Emergency drills and fire drills must be conducted in accordance with developmentally appropriate and age-appropriate procedures. Districts are authorized to develop policies that provide for accommodations for drills
      conducted by exceptional student education (ESE) centers, as defined in
      Section 1003.57(1)(a)1.a., F.S. District accommodations for drills conducted at ESE centers, if any, must be included in the written policies
      and procedures for exceptional students that are submitted to the
      Department in accordance with subsection 6A-6.03411(2), F.A.C. 
    7. Requirements for specific types of drills.
      1. Fire drills. Elementary, middle and high schools must conduct fire drills in accordance with the Florida Fire Prevention Code. 
      2. Emergency drills.
        1. Elementary, middle and high schools are required to conduct six (6) emergency drills every school year that are nonconcurrent with fire drills. One emergency drill must take place within the first ten (10) days of the beginning of the school year, and the remaining drills must take place at least every forty-five (45) days that school is in session. Four (4) of the six (6) emergency drills must address active threats. The remaining two (2) drills must address other emergency events, such as severe weather, natural disasters, hazardous materials, or reunification. 
        2. Active assailant drills. The District’s School Safety Specialist must coordinate with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office to determine which law enforcement officers are responsible for responding to each school in the District in the event of an active assailant emergency and must provide those officers a minimum of (24) hours’ notice prior to conducting an active assailant emergency drill, pursuant to Section 1006.07(4)(a), F.S. These law enforcement officers must be physically present on each school campus and directly involved in the execution of active assailant emergency drills, unless their presence is determined to be unnecessary by the sheriff. 
  6. ACTIVE ASSAILANT RESPONSE PLANS
    1. The district shall adopt an active assailant response plan, as provided in Section 1006.07(6)(c), F.S. Active assailant response plans must include, at a minimum, plans and expectations for responding to an active assailant situation using the following three (3) strategies: evading or evacuating, taking cover or hiding, and responding to or fighting back. 
    2. All school personnel must be trained annually on the procedures in the district’s active assailant response plan. Completion of this annual training for all school personnel must be documented in the FSSAT by October 1 of each year. 
    3. The Active Assailant Response Plans shall be located in the District’s Emergency Procedures Manual (DEPM). 
  7. FAMILY REUNIFICATION PLANS. The board will adopt, in coordination with local law enforcement agencies and local governments, a family reunification plan to reunite students and employees with their families in the event that a school is closed or unexpectedly evacuated due to a natural or manmade disaster. This reunification plan must be reviewed annually and updated, as needed. Individual school plans must be consistent with district policies. At a minimum, district reunification plans must address:
    1. Identification of potential reunification sites; 
    2. Training for employees; 
    3. Multiple methods to effectively communicate with family members of
      students and staff; and
       
    4. Methods to aid law enforcement in student and staff identification. 

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41, F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 119.07, 281.301, 1006.07, F.S.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.0018, F.A.C.  
HISTORY: ADOPTED: JUNE 4, 2019

REVISED: JULY 12, 2021;  OCTOBER 10, 2022; AUGUST 1, 2023

FORMERLY: NEW

Back to Top


8.97 HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

  1. Human trafficking and domestic violence are major problems in the United States. Human trafficking is defined as the transporting, soliciting, recruiting, harboring, providing or obtaining of another person for transport; for the purposes of forced labor, domestic servitude or sexual exploitation using force, fraud and/or coercion. As described in F.S. 787.06, human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery, and it is often accompanied by domestic violence.
  2. Addressing and preventing human trafficking and domestic violence in school communities requires the collective efforts of trained individuals and entities inside and outside schools. Prevention begins with training and awareness of how to identify at-risk minors and warning signs of relevant behavior. In addition, student safety and the risk of abuse affect students’ ability to be successful in school.
  3. The School Board authorizes the Superintendent or designee(s) to:
    1. educate all District employees and students about: (a) the risks associated with human trafficking and domestic violence and how they affect student learning, and (b) the importance of identifying and reporting suspected instances of human trafficking and domestic violence;
    2. provide information to raise awareness about these issues to all members of the District, including employees, students, and parents;
    3. make student support services available to victims, including counseling, health services, psychological services, and referrals to available assistance with partner organizations that offer support services outside the school day.
  4. In addition to the state required curriculum, the School Board directs the Superintendent of Schools to develop and implement: (a) training to be provided to all district employees about the prevention and awareness of human trafficking, and (b) procedures for the identification and referral of human trafficking victims to appropriate authorities and support agencies. The Superintendent shall develop administrative procedures to implement this policy no later than June 1, 2020, and distribute annually to district staff.
  5. In accordance with Rule 6A-1.094123, the Superintendent shall provide an annual report to the State of Florida Commissioner of Education, and provide the Board with a copy of the aforesaid report describing the district’s activities in the prior school year.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.41,1001.42 F.S.
LAW(S) IMPLEMENTED: 787.06, F.S.
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE(S): 6A-1.094123, F.A.C.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: MARCH 3, 2020
REVISION DATE(S): N/A
FORMERLY: NEW

 


8.98 SCHOOL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRESSIVE
DISCIPLINE POLICY


The School Board recognizes its commitment to maintaining safe and secure
environments includes the implementation of safety and security best practices within
district schools. Pursuant to Florida Statute 1006.07, effective July 1, 2024, the School
Board of Duval County shall ensure compliance with the following school safety
requirements:

  1. All gates or other access points that restrict ingress to or egress from a school campus shall remain closed and locked when students are on campus. A gate or other campus access point may not be open or unlocked, regardless of whether it is during normal school hours, unless:
    1. Attended or actively staffed by a person when students are on campus;
    2. The use is in accordance with a shared use agreement pursuant to s. 1013.101;
      or
    3. The School Safety Specialist, or his or her designee, has documented in the Florida Safe Schools Assessment Tool (FSSAT) portal maintained by the Office of Safe Schools (the Office) that the gate or other access point is not subject to this requirement based upon other safety measures at the school. The Office may conduct a compliance visit pursuant to s. 1001.212(14), F.S. to review if such determination is appropriate.
  2. All school classrooms and other instructional spaces must be locked to prevent ingress when occupied by students, except between class periods when students are moving between classrooms or other instructional spaces. If a classroom or other instructional space door must be left unlocked or open for any reason other than between class periods when students are moving between classrooms or other instructional spaces, the door must be actively staffed by a person standing or seated at the door.
  3. All campus access doors, gates, and other access points that allow ingress to or egress from a school building shall remain closed and locked at all times to prevent ingress, unless a person is actively entering or exiting the door, gate, or other access point or the School Safety Specialist, or his or her designee, has documented in the Florida Safe Schools Assessment Tool portal maintained by the Office of Safe Schools that the open and unlocked door, gate, or other access point is not subject to this requirement based upon other safety measures at the school. The Office of Safe Schools may conduct a compliance visit pursuant to s. 1001.212(14), F.S. to review if such determination is appropriate. All campus access doors, gates, and other access points may be electronically or manually controlled by school personnel to allow access by authorized visitors, students, and school personnel.
  4. All school classrooms and other instructional spaces must clearly and conspicuously mark the safest areas in each classroom or other instructional space where students must shelter in place during an emergency. Students must be notified of these safe areas within the first 10 days of the school year. If it is not feasible to clearly and conspicuously mark the safest areas in a classroom or other instructional space, the School Safety Specialist, or his or her designee, must document such determination in the Florida Safe Schools Assessment Tool portal maintained by the Office of Safe Schools, identifying where affected students must shelter in place. The Office shall assist the School Safety Specialist with compliance during the inspection required under s. 1001.212(14), F.S.
  5. Persons who are aware of a violation of this policy must report the violation to the school principal. The school principal must report the violation to the School Safety Specialist no later than the next business day after receiving such report. If the person who violated this policy is the school principal, the report must be made directly to the Superintendent.
  6. Progressive discipline policy. — Any instructional personnel as defined in s.
    1012.01(2), F.S. or any administrative personnel as defined in s. 1012.01(3), F.S. who knowingly violate the school safety requirement, shall be subject to progressive discipline outlined in Board Policy 6.73, Suspension and Dismissal. This provision shall also apply to contracted personnel who shall be subject to discipline according to the governing contract. The district may recommend discipline up to termination for contracted personnel.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: 1001.42, F.S.
LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 1006.07, F.S.
HISTORY: ADOPTED: MAY 7, 2024
1399

 

Back to Top